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The non-degree Humanities and Sciences program at School of Visual Arts offers over 200 courses

  • SVA is committed to providing a well-rounded education to its artists through its offerings in the humanities and sciences
  • We offer English as Second Language courses and Peer Tutoring to assist international students
  • The Writing Resource Center offers computers, Internet access and instructors for consultation and tutoring

Request information at [email protected] to learn more about humanities and sciences college classes at SVA.

Like nature, art abhors a vacuum. Art is noisy and busy, a roiling ferment of ideas, impressions, attitudes, values and relationships. Art, in other words, doesn't just appear from your fingertips: It's made from culture.

An arts education at SVA connects your hand to your eye and your mind to the world. Out of a matrix of learning in history, politics, literature, psychology, anatomy, biology and technology, you evolve as an artist. From Chaucer to William S. Burroughs, Stravinsky to the Ramones, Karl Marx to bell hooks, you get a cultural grounding that is at once classical and contemporary, canonical and cutting-edge. You'll discover that the more you have to say, the bigger statement your art will make.

With over 200 courses and more than 100 instructors, SVA has one of the richest, deepest, most imaginative humanities and sciences curriculums of any arts college. Our teachers are anything but dry, hidebound academics. You'll study with poets, filmmakers, curators, performance artists, illustrators and veterans of federal and city governmentbusy doers who are also heavy thinkers. You'll see ideas in action, like the decorated Vietnam veteran/philosophy professor who takes his War and Morality students to a VA hospital to speak with posttraumatic stress syndrome patients.

Writing and a fluent command of English is the core of the humanities and sciences. The Writing Resource Center, with computers, Internet access and instructors on hand for consultation and tutoring, reflects our commitment to producing artists who embrace the written word as a form of expression not alien to, but supporting, the visual arts.

Good language skills will help you better understand your work as an artist, clarifying your intentions, articulating your vision.

Humanities and sciences introduces you to a multitude of great thinkers' ideas, giving you an opportunity to project your perspective through the prism of many different minds. Your point of view will open up, your eye will widenand your art will reflect the world.

General Course Listing

Foundation Requirements

HCD-1020 / HCD-1025
Writing and Literature I and II
Two semesters: 3 humanities and sciences credits per semester
The first part of this two-semester offering will help students become capable, critical and independent writers. With its focus on developing an argument, the course offers an introduction to some of the skills necessary for critical analysis of written art. It will include a review of writing basics (grammar, coherence, idea development, sentence and essay structure). Since reading widely is a foundation of good writing, course readings are drawn from a selection of premodern Western works, including drama, poetry, the narrative and the critical essay, which will be used as discussion and writing prompts. The second semester will emphasize essay development, reading and critical thinking. Students will write essays and a research paper, and continue to work on their grammar and essay development. Readings are drawn from a selection of modern works, including drama, poetry, the narrative and the critical essay.

Upper-Level Courses 

HWD-2000
Writing About Art
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
In this critical writing course, students will be immersed in the world of the arts, which spans multiple genres and styles. We will read and discuss inspiring essays by artists and critics, such as the great film editor Walter Murch, cultural critic Camille Paglia, the novelists James Baldwin and Tom Wolfe, and art grandee Dave Hickey, along with the crackling prose of artist-eccentrics such as William Blake, Vincent van Gogh and Andy Warhol. Students will also be introduced to autobiographical works, including William Eggleston’s film Stranded in Canton, in order to explore how the personal narrative is transformed into a sparkling art. This reading and arts immersion will guide students to write eloquently, confidently, and with an abundance of passion for their own artistic practice, as well as that of others. Students will keep journals detailing their gallery/museum visits and place writing—including their own—under the microscope.

HWD-2103
Everybody’s a Critic: Writing About Pop Culture
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Whether it’s music, movies, theater or television, all of us react to pop culture through the prism of our individual experience. But how does that process work? How do we decide what songs, shows, actors or directors we like or dislike, and what do those choices say to others about us? In this course, we will explore the individual pop aesthetic, and how to successfully articulate in writing the critical voice that everyone possesses. Through assignments, collective reviews and analysis of works by critics—including Lester Bangs (music), John Leonard (TV), Manny Farber (film) and Frank Rich (theater)—we will examine the unique challenges critics face as both arbiters of taste and as writers seeking to effectively express themselves.

HWD-2124
Capture and Release: Writing Through the Animal
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
In the Judeo-Christian story of creation, humans are formed and immediately granted dominion over the animals, marking this relationship between the human-self and animal-other as implicit to our being. Is it any wonder that the Western cultural imagination brims over with songs, tales and renderings of beasts that are at one moment our companions and at the next, our adversaries? This course will investigate the fraught relationship between humans and animals through critical writing practice. Pairing ancient texts like Genesis and Aesop’s Fables with contemporary essays (by thinkers such as Temple Grandin, William Cronon and David Levi Strauss) and Werner Herzog’s film Grizzly Man, we will explore political, ethical and theoretical questions related to caring for, learning from and conquering animals—both wild and domestic. We’ll study mystical texts that posit animal sentience in the highest esteem, such as the classic The Conference of the Birds, and the influential Black Elk Speaks. Finally, we’ll delve into the communication separating the species in order to ask what it might mean to know the animal both outside and in.

HWD-2254
Land of Saints and Sinners: Writing Through Ireland
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The excitement and mystery of Irish authors is unique. Ireland has produced an exceptional number of influential writers in English whose language and sensibility are made musical by origins in Irish Gaelic. Romanticist and modernist poetry, drama, memoir and fiction are also influenced by Ireland’s mythology, evidence of which is embedded in the landscape. In response to prose examples, beginning with “The Cattle Raid of Cooley” set in an Irish heroic culture comparable to the bronze age of Homer’s epics, students will craft several types of critical essays in which they practice the skills and pleasures of critical thinking and writing in a variety of techniques. Readings will include selections from 19th- and 20th-century memoirs, such as Peig Sayers’s or Maurice O’Sullivan’s on growing up on Great Blasket Island and W.B. Yeats’s Autobiographies and Mythologies. We will then move to essays and brief tales by Yeats’s contemporaries: J.M. Synge’s assessment of the Aran Islands, Lady Gregory’s Kiltartan folklore collected on her estate, Coole Park, in County Galway, and satirical fiction by Dublin journalist Brian O’Nolan. Concluding with comparative analyses of two stories in James Joyce’s Dubliners, students will have come to distinguish between social satire and historical memoir.

HWD-2268
The Power and the Pity: Brutal Tales From Latin America
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
With savage beauty, 20th-century storytellers have reacted to the unparalleled violence and horrors of Latin America’s history. This writing course asks students to reflect upon the masterworks of a handful of these fierce writers, from the Peruvian Mario Vargas Llosa to the Colombian Gabriel Marquez. Together, we will enter the damp underground chambers where the bones of electroshock victims have been left to rot; spy through the keyholes into the palatial bedrooms of sociopathic dictators, where the dripping heads of student revolucionarios hang from the rafters—and write. Students will also examine the wounded poetry of the great Pablo Neruda and the reportage by the gutsy Cuban journalist Alma Guillermoprieto, as well as watch films that explore the barbarity of some of history’s worst monsters, such as the controversial Human Remains by Jay Rosenblatt and the recent Chilean film, Tony Manero. Confronted with the brutalities of colonization and its aftermath, students will respond critically in their own writing.

HWD-2304
New Media and You
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Do you have the sense that technology is moving faster than you? It is and this creates great pressure to be clear, brief and informative, and challenging enough to demand a response. You can no longer transpose standard writing onto web-based projects and Social Media Systems (SMS). New media demands new forms of writing and expectations. Do you know the differences and how to think, structure, compose and write effectively across the new platforms? This experimental writing course will study and integrate words with images in different media to improve your writing and help you understand the conventions, advantages, opportunities and limits of print and web-based writing. We will read contemporary critics of new media, and write projects in traditional and web-based media platforms to distinguish between them and develop a concise integration of words and images that reinforce each other to affect a visually literate audience. Both individually and as a class, students will write a blog as a collaborative group project that will promote reader response.

HWD-3001 
Experimental Writing: Spontaneous Poetics
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course is a workshop in fiction and poetry—with a twist. Using the standard notions of story, play and poem as points of departure, we will focus on linguistic experimentation. Topics will include the interrelationship of writing with other art forms, such as film, painting and music. Automatic writing, spontaneous bop prosody, sketching, “first thought, best thought” are some of the techniques that will be used to help students find their own forms of expressions. Readings will be selected from Jack Kerouac, Ernest Hemingway, Paul Bowles, Allen Ginsberg and James Joyce, among other noted authors.

HWD-3002
Experimental Writing: Collage Poetics
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will focus on linguistic experimentation as well as the students’ own imaginative visual art (a brief film or graphic novel, for example) to illustrate visual texts. We will examine the juxtapositions of language with visual art in the creation of hybrid forms. Topics include the relationship of fiction to nonfiction, adaptation of fiction to film and such genres as the graphic novel. Techniques of cut ups will be used to render states of consciousness in written form. Readings will be selected from Kathy Acker, William S. Burroughs, Gertrude Stein, Brion Gysin and Robert Crumb, among other noted literary and visual artists.

HWD-3014
Storytelling and Narrative Art
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
What is story and why do we love it? Why has storytelling been a basic feature of all cultures since earliest days of the human community? What role does narrative play in culture and society? In this course, we will embark on a transmedia exploration of storytelling, investigating both art and theory, and surveying narrative ideas, from evolution and neurobiology through myth, religion and psychology. Traditional art forms will be examined (literature, film, photography, painting), as well as the immersive storytelling of gaming, advertising and fan-generated narrative. Ultimately, we will address politics and history—areas of social narrative that intimately affect our lives. Authors and artists studied include: Jonathan Gottschall; V.S. Ramachandran; Spike Jonze; Frank Rose; Francesca Woodman; Frida Kahlo; James Agee; Pablo Larrain; Rebecca Solnit.

HWD-3016
Immersive Storytelling
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Immersion explores the creation of participatory storytelling experiences that cut across genres and media. The audience becomes actively involved, social and creative collaborators. The unfolding story design creates the motivation to engage with other participants, seek out other parts of the story, and contribute to the narrative by adding content. Students will work on both collaborative and individual projects, exploring how different narratives evolve in different media. This is a writing program course intended for students from all departments, and work will embrace design, gaming, photography, film, animation, and bio art, among others. We will study the work of experience designers like Lance Weiler, and we will draw from traditional disciplines, with readings such as: Elia Kazan, Kazan on Directing; Lynda Barry, Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor; William Morris, Words & Wisdom; George Orwell, “Politics and the English Language.”

HWD-3111 
Creative Nonfiction
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
A workshop in the language and craft of nonfiction, this course will explore the genres of memoir, personal essay, travel essay, graphic personal history and the new journalism. Readings will be selected from the work of Virginia Woolf, V.S. Naipul, M.F.K. Fisher, André Aciman, Mary Karr, Kathryn Harrison, Norman Mailer, Truman Capote, Hunter S. Thompson and Art Spiegelman.

HWD-3119
The Creative Self: Autobiography
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
In this writing workshop, each student will craft his or her autobiography while reflecting on personal and creative life experiences. We will take a close look at the construction of the self, drawing comparisons among literary forms and exploring the tensions inherent in self-narration: self-invention vs. self-disclosure, design vs. truth and memory vs. imagination. This course is a voyage of self-discovery. Students will write a narrative manuscript and keep personal journals. A guest author will conduct an in-class workshop. We will read works of narrative self-disclosure by such contemporary authors as Richard Wright, Sylvia Plath, Mary Karr, Malika Oufkir, Bei Dao and Vladimir Nabokov.

HWD-3222 
Writing Speculative Fiction
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This workshop-based course focuses on the writing of speculative fiction. From the earliest wonderings about extraterrestrial life to the dystopian future Earth of The Hunger Games, we have always speculated on “what ifs?” Students will write stories in at least two of these genres: magical realism, science fiction, horror, dark fantasy, biopunk and paranormal. We will also read classic stories and critical essays by Robert Heinlein, Theodore Sturgeon, Arthur C. Clarke, Roger Zelazny, William Gibson and Ray Bradbury; as well as recent authors, such as Kelly Link, Elizabeth Bear, Neal Stephenson and Xia Jia. Novels will include works by Aldous Huxley, Paolo Bacigalupi and Robert Sawyer. Students will complete a portfolio of stories and critical essays.

HWD-3236 
The Art of Words
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
In this workshop, student assignments in poetry and short fiction will be critiqued. Content and craft will be analyzed in order to develop editing and revision skills. We will read from contemporary minimalist and impressionist writers as well as more traditional writers, to understand their history and impact on the literary world. Works by such writers as Joy Williams, Raymond Carver, Bei Dao, Tobias Wolff, Ann Sexton and Annie Proulx will be read. Student work will be submitted to the College’s literary magazine.

HWD-3244
Journals: Yours and Theirs
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
How many half-filled notebooks do you have lying around? Have you always wanted to fill up a journal but find you can’t keep it up? This course is designed to help you do just that. Everyone will write at home in his or her personal journal at least three times a week. In addition, in class you will write to suggested prompts and topics, and read that writing aloud to give you practice in sharing your thoughts and feelings, which are the stuff of journal writing. Keeping a journal is crucial to an artist because it develops a private space in which to connect your art with that of others. We will also explore journals of great writers such as Virginia Woolf, Albert Camus, Sylvia Plath, Sappho Durrell, Allen Ginsberg, Anton Chekhov, Mike Figgis, Lord Byron, Juanita de la Sorjuana and Walter Benjamin, including the logbooks of women whalers from the 19th century. The journal will be yours to keep except what you choose to share. It will not be graded or handed in. Each student will select a published journal to explore and critique.

HWD-3245 
Art of the Journal/Journal as Art
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will focus on reading the journals of visual artists that will model the connection between the written and the visual. The requirements for keeping the journal are to write at least three times a week outside of class, to write to prompts in class and to read aloud in class. The journal will also include a visual component—sketches, cartoons, cut-outs, cut ups, collages—whatever you feel will add to the mood and content of the journal, which will express more of what you do and who you are. The journal will be yours, private, glanced at but not graded. You will read from journals of artists such as Wojnarowicz, Da Vinci, Warhol, Degas, Cézanne, Van Gogh, dancer Vladimir Nijinsky, musicians David Byrne and Henry Rollins. You will find an artist from your field and critique his or her work.

HWD-3552
Writing, Multimedia and Performance
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The excitement of writing a poem or short fiction and sharing it with an audience can be taken to another level when music and/or visual components are added. This course invites you to write creative pieces with the intent of combining them with multimedia elements for a live performance. You will choose a topic to develop material and then add multimedia elements (music, video, photos, painting, collage), and practice reading what you write in order to sharpen your ear for language and sound. A live performance will cap the course, during which students will present their finished projects. Readings and exercises will be drawn from works by Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsberg, Margaret Atwood, Etgar Keret, Joy Harjo, Laurie Anderson and Patricia Smith, as well as critical essays, including “Imagist Poetry,” Amy Lowell; “Visual Performance of the Poetic Text,” Johanna Drucker; “The Poetics of Disobedience,” Alice Notley and “The Mind’s Own Place,” George Oppen.

HWD-3990
Writing Portfolio
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The writing portfolio is the culmination of a student’s work in the Writing Program. With the help of a mentor, each student will create a body of work—critical, creative and, where applicable, interdisciplinary. In the fall, students should discuss their ideas with a Writing Program instructor of their choice and prepare a statement of intent. Chair approval of the project is required before the spring semester.

Music

HDD-2188
Music in Western Civilization I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course presents a preliminary survey of masterpieces of Western music in their historical context, with an exploration into compositional techniques and concurrent developments in other art forms. Music will be selected from medieval, baroque, classical and Romantic periods, including works by Palestrina, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Brahms, Liszt and Wagner, among others. Recordings; films; slides of painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and live performances will be coordinated with the class sessions.

HDD-2189
Music in Western Civilization II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course presents a secondary survey of masterpieces of Western music in their historical context, with an exploration into compositional techniques and concurrent developments in other art forms. Music will be selected from late Romantic through 20th century periods, including works by Mahler, Strauss, Ives, Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Henze, Cage, Stockhausen, Xenakis and Glass, among others. Recordings; films; slides of painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and live performances will be coordinated with the class sessions.

HDD-2233
20th-Century Music I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Masterpieces of Western music from the first half of the 20th century are explored in this course, with a discussion of compositional techniques and their relationship to concurrent art forms. Music will be selected from the works of Mahler, Ives, Stravinsky, Satie, Prokofieff, Rachmaninoff, Schoenberg, Berg, Webern and Varèse, among others. Recordings; films; slides of painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and live performances will be coordinated with the class sessions.

HDD-2234
20th-Century Music II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Masterpieces of Western music from the second half of the 20th century are explored in this course, with a discussion of compositional techniques and their relationship to concurrent art forms. Music will be selected from the works of Henze, Boulez, Stockhausen, Berio, Ligeti, Xenakis, Penderecki, Cage, Reich and Glass, among others. Recordings; films; slides of painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and live performances will be coordinated with the class sessions.

HDD-2334
Music in Culture I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will begin the exploration of the cultural history of popular music in 20th-century America (1920-1964), with particular emphasis on the beginnings of recorded blues and hillbilly music in the 1920s and 1930s, the evolution from rural-based genres to more urban forms such as rhythm and blues and country and western during the 1940s, the bridging of various styles into the rock ‘n roll revolution of the 1950s, the emergence of record producers, the origins of surf and soul music, and the folk revival of the 1960s. Along the way, we will closely examine the work of such seminal artists as Robert Johnson, Hank Williams, Muddy Waters, Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, Ray Charles, Phil Spector and Brian Wilson.

HDD-2336
Music in Culture II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will continue the exploration of the cultural history of popular music in the 20th century (1964 to the present), with particular emphasis on the British Invasion and the subsequent rise of folk rock, garage and psychedelia during the mid-to-late 1960s; country rock and disco to heavy metal, punk and new wave in the 1970s; MTV and the first video generation of the 1980s; rap, grunge and other 1990s alternatives, and the return of the teen idol in the new millennium. Along the way, we will closely examine the work of such seminal artists as the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, the Ramones, Prince, U2, Madonna, Nirvana and Eminem.

HDD-2339
Songs of Conscience: Music and Social Change
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Throughout history, music has shown itself to be a powerful force for social and political change. This course will examine the role of music in expressing the hopes, fears, attitudes and dreams of the common man and woman, and of the struggle to help the unempowered and underprivileged of society. We will listen to, read about and discuss the works of socially and politically committed artists from all walks of music, including folk (Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan), rock (John Lennon, Bruce Springsteen), soul (Aretha Franklin, Marvin Gaye), rap (Public Enemy, Tupac Shakur), reggae (Bob Marley, Peter Tosh) and country (The Carter Family, Willie Nelson).

HDD-2348
History of Jazz
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will begin with an examination of the African roots of jazz and early African-American forms such as spirituals, work songs, and ragtime. We will see the beginnings of jazz as a blending of European and African elements in brass bands at the turn of the 20th century. We will then study each subsequent phase of this music through the works of representative artists such as Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Charlie Parker and Miles Davis, and attempt to place these developments in cultural perspective. Musical examples will be presented in a way that can be readily understood by anyone.

HDD-2513
Heroines of the Musical Stage
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will examine the representation and contributions of women to the pivotal musical dramas of our age. Among the works to be considered are Bizet’s Carmen, Puccini’s Tosca, Verdi’s La Traviata, Strauss’s Salome, Donizetti’s Lucia, Beethoven’s Fidelio and Rossini’s Barber of Seville. We will also take a look at some of the favorite female vocal characters of the American musical theater. Videos and recordings of the famed Maria Callas, Cecilia Bartoli and Teresa Stratas will be screened and aired, and the class will attend a live performance at the Metropolitan Opera or the New York City Opera. Required text: Opera: A Listener’s Guide by Jack Sacher.

HDD-2514
Opera and the Human Condition
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Through the musical exploration of traditional operatic literature, we will examine music’s ability to probe human emotions and attempt to discover why inner demons torment so many heroes who have won the admiration of audiences throughout the world. We will hear arias and recitatives of the famous characters of Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Verdi’s Rigoletto, Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci, Brecht’s and Weill’s Mahagonny, Berg’s and Buechner’s Wozzeck and Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess. Original sets will be designed by students in a class presentation of an opera of their choice. Required text: Opera: A Listener’s Guide by Jack Sacher.

History

HHD-2001
History of Ancient Civilizations
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will cover the rise and early development of world civilizations from 3500 BCE through 500 CE. Our primary focus will be on the seminal civilizations of the Near East (Sumer, Akkad, Egypt, Assyria, Israel and Persia), as well the early history and culture of ancient Greece, Rome, China and India. The text will be Ancient Near Eastern History and Culture by William H. Stiebing, Jr.

HHD-2011
Medieval and Renaissance Perspectives
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
In this course students will explore aspects of Medieval and Renaissance culture, society and politics. Moving from the turmoil of early medieval Europe to the flowering of the 12th and 13th centuries, the catastrophes of the 14th century and the new humanist vision of the Renaissance, we will examine both the great achievements of the age and its darker side of violence and persecution. In the process we will look at the lives of notable individuals and ordinary people—thus putting a human face on such developments as feudalism, chivalry, the Crusades, the Inquisition and the Black Death.

HHD-2011
Medieval Perspectives and Origins of the Renaissance
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
People who lived during the thousand years between the end of the Roman Empire in the West and the discovery of the “New World” did not, of course, describe themselves as “medieval.” They thought they lived in “modern times.” We will study a selection of the political, institutional, cultural, religious, military and social topics that were once “current events.” Highlights include: the empire of Charlemagne, Anglo-Saxon England, monasticism, the Vikings, the Crusades, Arabic learning, the Eastern Roman Empire, the Black Death, the university, the Communes, chivalry and war. Throughout the course, emphasis will be on the work and words of medieval men and women. Texts include: Cruz and Gerberding, Medieval Worlds; Wiesner, Wheeler and Curtis, Discovering the Medieval Past; Internet Medieval Sourcebook.

HHD-2051
21st-Century History I: Globalization and the New World Order
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will address the major global trends defining the 21st century, looking back at historical roots and forward to potential paths. The interaction of corporate power, government power, people power and nature as they impact key issues will be examined, including the global economy, the role of nations, the end of the oil age, climate change and sustainability. We will use a specific lens—the political economy of food—to see how these forces play out in our lives, shaping how we answer the question: Will democracy make a difference?

HHD-2052
21st-Century History II: The Power of Citizens and Nations
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will review issues of economic globalization and America’s declining superpower role to focus on two major trends: the shifting fate of nations and the rise of people power in defining the new world order. We will look at how national and corporate powers are emerging around technology, energy and the environment. We will also look at the growing role of people power and social movements, in conflict with both established power systems and traditional hierarchies based on race, gender, class, religion and nationality.

HHD-2112
World History: Renaissance to the 21st Century
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will survey major landmarks in world history from the 15th century to the present. It will focus on significant political, economic, social and cultural developments from a global perspective. Topics will include: the Renaissance and the scientific revolution; the rise of Russia in Eastern Europe and Asia; modern revolutions in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas; global significance of the world wars; legacy of 19th-century thought for the present; unification of Europe and the prospects for peace.

HHD-2144
Modern Revolutions
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
A comparative examination of revolutionary movements, focusing on the large-scale political social, economic and cultural transformations in modern history will be explored. The course will begin with the American and French revolutions of the 18th century, continue with the Russian Revolution of 1917 and conclude with a discussion of the most important landmarks of the political and economic transformations in Eastern Europe today. Works by Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, Marx, Lenin, Sakharov and Havel will be discussed.

HHD-2777
United States History I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The forces behind the social, political and economic developments of American civilization—from the colonial to the reconstruction period—will be explored in this course. Readings, articles, films and documentaries will help to illustrate the growth of the United States as an empire in the West. Special topics include the motivation behind American colonialism, the Federal Union, religion, Romanticism, reform and the beginning of reconstruction. By the end of the semester, students will have gained an understanding of the details of American history as well as the role of America in the West. This course will also examine how American economic, political and social policies shaped the responses of government and ordinary citizens alike. Students will participate in special projects and research that will help them to synthesize and analyze early U.S. history.

HHD-2778
United States History II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will examine the forces behind the social, political and economic developments of American civilization and their interrelationships from the reconstruction period to present America. Special topics include the motivation behind American expansionism, the development of political parties, immigration, urbanization and industrialization, major movements and individuals; trends in the history of women and the family, and the emergence of cities. By the end of the semester, students will have an understanding of American history as well as the role of America in world affairs. We will also examine how American economic, political and social policies shape the responses of government and ordinary citizens alike. Students will participate in special projects and research that will help them synthesize and analyze U.S history.

HHD-2785
Social Life and Culture of Western Peoples
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Only a few centuries ago, most people in Western nations still lived in drafty huts, believed in witches, and saw death and disease take friends and family members in great numbers. Moreover, most of them toiled away in societies without modern political institutions or ideas of individual rights. This course will examine the social and cultural changes that brought about fundamental developments in our world during the last two centuries. Special attention will be given to the effects and consequences of the Industrial Revolution on the lifestyles, beliefs and culture at all levels of society. We will survey topics such as changes in family structure, attitudes toward work, entertainment, the role of religion, and attitudes toward new scientific theories. Lastly, we will explore institutional responses to changing social needs and examine their historical effects on people’s lives to the present day. Sources will include contemporary artifacts, both material and literary, as well as recent historical studies.

HHD-2811
Constitutional Law
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Is the Constitution under attack? Warrantless wiretaps, citizens detained without due process—are these unconstitutional attacks on our rights or the legitimate exercise of presidential power? Everyone talks about the Constitution, yet many people know little about it. What rights does it protect? What powers does it give to the Congress as opposed to the President? This course will examine what the Constitution has meant throughout the country’s history and how it may (or may not) work in the 21st century.

HHD-2990/HHD-2995
Western Civilization I and II
Two semesters: 3 humanities and sciences credits per semester
This course provides a historical overview of Western thought from the Renaissance to the early 20th century. Students will explore the ways in which history and culture have interacted to shape the development of societies and individuals in the modern age. We will focus on major historical transformations such as the Renaissance and the Reformation (first semester), the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution (second semester), in order to understand how such pivotal events both condition and reflect movements in science, philosophy and the arts. The course will also provide an introduction to the assumptions, strategies and methods that inform the disciplines of history, philosophy and the social sciences. Readings include selections from: A History of Modern Europe, vols. I and II; Plato; Hobbes; Descartes; Locke; Voltaire; Kant; Mill; Marx; Nietzsche; Freud; Heisenberg; Einstein.

HHD-3011
History of Ideas: The 20th Century I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will focus on the social, political and economic background of the 20th century. We will examine Victorianism, imperialism, World War I, the Russian Revolution and other developments, through the 1920s. The ideas of Marx, Lenin, Freud, Darwin, and others will be covered in historical context.

HHD-3012
History of Ideas: The 20th Century II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course is a continuation of History of Ideas: The 20th Century I. Topics include: the Depression, New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the turbulent 1960s, the civil rights movement, Vietnam, Watergate, Irangate, the third world. The ideas of Hitler; Mao; Martin Luther King, Jr.; and the issues behind McCarthyism, totalitarianism, socialism, capitalism and communism will be discussed.

HHD-3017
Enlightenment, Reason and Modern Culture
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The Enlightenment inspired many things by emphasizing the power of human reason—things such as political equality, anti-authoritarianism, modern science, criticism of religion, and more. So profound was this development that many fundamental ideals and institutions of the modern world still base themselves on Enlightenment principles. This course will trace the trajectory of Enlightenment thought by considering its key ideas and achievements, and then by examining the ways in which these contributions have been questioned (and occasionally rejected) in the modern day. Topics covered will be wide-ranging: from religion to politics, aesthetics, philosophy and science. Our goal is to understand the continuing role of the Enlightenment in the modern world and the more recent ideas that seek to scale it back. Readings will include primary sources as well as recent historical studies.

HHD-3022
Turning Points in History: From the French Revolution to the Present
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will focus on some of the pivotal events—from the Enlightenment to the space race and beyond—that have shaped the modern world. The historical contributions of such thinkers as of Locke, Voltaire, Darwin, Nietzsche, Einstein and Ellis will be examined.

HHD-3144
Crisis and Conflict in Early Modern Europe
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
New political theories, social unrest, economic upheaval and intellectual discontent often rocked early modern Europe, resulting in a series of crises. Crisis was often accompanied by open conflict, as challenges to various forms of authority were posed by changing geopolitics, inventive minds and a growing middle class that was no longer satisfied with its place within the social hierarchy. From the wars of religion and the rise of absolutism, to the onset of the Industrial Revolution and the French Revolution, we will explore the political, social and intellectual developments of the early modern European nation-states.

HHD-3226
Science and History: Ideas and Controversies
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Scientific study of the world around us has had profound effects on our modern lives, beliefs and identities. This course will survey the main ideas in the emergence of modern science, as well as the cultural contexts and conflicts involved in its development. We will take a broad overview, from the late-Middle Ages to the modern day, with a focus on key developments such as the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution and the remarkable discoveries of the 19th and 20th centuries. We will also cover key controversies to get a better understanding of the cultural context of science in different time periods. These controversies include Galileo’s trial, the challenge of mechanical theories to religious authority, the emergence of Darwin’s Theory of Evolution and its consequences and, lastly, concerns related to modern science such as biomedical and military research. Readings will include primary sources as well as recent historical studies.

HHD-3288
Historical Introduction to Philosophy
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The great thinkers of the Western world will be examined in their historical context in an attempt to explain how their thought is a reflection and transformation of their culture. Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Marx, Rousseau, Mill, Nietzsche, Freud, Sartre, among others, will be studied and related to areas as diverse as the scientific revolution, the Industrial Revolution and modernism in art.

HHD-3328
The World Since 1945
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will examine the conflicts, crises, and trends that have built our modern world. We will cover the Cold War, nuclear proliferation, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, decolonization, the European Union, the creation of Israel and the Israeli-Arab Wars, the breakup of the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia, and current conflicts from Darfur to Baghdad to the “War on Terror.”

HHD-3331
World War II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The social, political and military roots of the Second World War will be addressed in this course. We will then trace their development throughout the war, with a focus on American involvement. Finally, we will look at the aftermath and consequences brought about by the hostilities. Through writings and films, we will read and screen firsthand accounts of those who experienced the war.

HHD-3334
Postcolonial Africa
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Africa is said to be the cradle of human civilization. Today, it is a continent of reemerging independent nations with a complex history and a changing pattern of indigenous ways of life. This course will explore the culture and history of the African continent from the 1870s to the present, focusing on East, West and Southern Africa. Readings will include works of both European and African writers and activists. Selected videos will be screened.

HHD-3367
A People’s History of the United States I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the social and labor history of the United States. Topics such as slavery, American Indian resistance, reform movements and what it meant to be “American” will be explored. Readings include such works as slave petitions inspired by the American Revolution, Tecumseh on American Indians and land; Orestes Brownson, “The Laboring Classes”; Elizabeth Cady Stanton, “Declaration of Sentiments”; Henry David Thoreau, Civil Disobedience.

HHD-3368
A People’s History of the United States II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
American history since 1865 will be examined in this course. Such topics as reconstruction, the rise of labor unions, industrialization, political parties, civil rights, the peace movement and the emergence of identity politics will be discussed. Readings include works by Chief Joseph; Eugene V. Debs; Margaret Sanger; Marcus Garvey; Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; Allen Ginsberg and César Chavez.

HHD-3451
Creative and Destructive Personalities in History
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Individuals can make a profound impression on history. Whether they are founding new institutions or destroying civilizations, unique personalities can be seen as a powerful source for changes in society. In this course we will look at a variety of significant people—from Buddha to the Beatles, from Julius Caesar to Genghis Kahn, and others—to see how their actions and their legacies influenced the world.

HHD-3467
Prehistory
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The beginnings of history from the first proto-humans until the development of agriculture and the end of the Stone Age about three million years later will be examined in this course. Topics include the origins of such essentially human activities as art, architecture, religion, gender, patriarchy and war. Readings will be supplemented by screenings of films such as Herzog’s Cave of Forgotten Dreams.

HHD-3611
History of Religion
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will survey the major religions of the world, beginning with Hinduism, Zoroastrianism and Judaism, and ending with Christianity and Islam. The spiritual crisis of the sixth century BCE that gave rise to Buddhism, Confucianism and Taoism in the East will be compared to the epochs that gave rise to Christianity and Islam. While examining the similarities as well as the differences in the ultimate concepts of major Eastern and Western religions, such as moksha, nirvana, Tao and the kingdom of heaven, this course will explore the historical conditions in which the world religions evolved.

HHD-3643
Religious Fundamentalism
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Religious fundamentalism is a major force in modern societies. It increasingly affects both the domestic and international concerns of peoples around the world as fundamentalist groups seek to remake their societies according to their understanding of the divine. In this course, we will explore the forces and ideas behind the rise of fundamentalism and seek to understand the main concerns and beliefs of fundamentalists around the globe. Moreover, we will try to understand their values, thought processes and ways of life. We will also consider the consequences of fundamentalist beliefs on politics and culture from the 1960s to the present. Readings for this course will include modern scholarship on contemporary fundamentalist movements as well as selected texts produced by fundamentalists themselves.

HHD-3651
Eco-Politics: Who Rules America?
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
What are the real connections between politics and the economy? We will trace the development of the free enterprise system, with special emphasis on the inherent contradictions between American capitalism and democracy. Discussion will focus on such issues as the rise and fall of traditional economic systems, ranging from feudalism to socialism; the evolution of the United States from the ideal of social equality as envisioned in the First and 14th Amendments of the American Constitution and the threats to that ideal; the debate over whether poverty can be eliminated in a free enterprise system; industrialism’s legacy of environmental abuse and the survival of the planet; economic planning vs. the free market: which strategy will work best within the emerging international economy? Selected readings from Carson, Economic Issues Today: Alternative Approaches; Cochran and Lawrence, American Public Policy; Barke and Stone, Governing The American Republic: Economics, Law and Policies. Readings will be supplemented by pertinent videos and guest speakers.

HHD-3766
Politics and Power in America: From FDR to the Present
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The Cold War, the civil rights movement, the 1960s, Watergate, Reagan’s “revolution” and Iran-Contra: What did each of these reveal about politics and power in American society? We’ll read and screen videos about these topics along with the Great Depression, McCarthyism, Vietnam and the future of American politics. Issues of social justice and democracy will be major themes. The course will be conducted in a lecture-discussion format.

HHD-3788
China: Past and Present
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
After a generation of isolation, the world is now in full communication with the globe’s most populous nation. The course aims to provide a broad background in China’s history and culture. We will examine the impact of Confucianism and Buddhism on China’s political and social development and China’s role in politics, industry and global relations in view of the new, major changes in Chinese communism. The scope ranges from the classic ancient dynasties of Shang, Han, Tang, Sung and Ming to contemporary times. A selection of films will supplement the lectures and study projects.

HHD-3883
From Books to Blogs: A Cultural History of Communication
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
From the invention of moveable type in the 15th century to the evolving technology of the Internet, societies around the globe have benefited from the spread of ideas, but often at the cost of profound and permanent change. This course will explore the ways in which communication technologies have shaped and continue to influence global cultures. We will not only examine the ways in which printing and other forms of information exchange changed the pre-industrial world, but we will also consider the social and cultural ramifications of more recent communications technologies such as radio, television and computers. Readings will include studies on the history and influence of communications technologies from the Renaissance to the present.

HHD-3889
Totalitarianism
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore the social, economic and cultural circumstances that have lead to the creation of totalitarian regimes as well as those forces that continue to sustain them. Various manifestations of 20th-century communism and fascism will be considered along with the development and spread of modern theocratic forms of totalitarianism. We will focus particularly on cultural developments that have fostered totalitarianism, although these will be examined within wider socio-political contexts. Our goals will be to understand the nature of historical totalitarianism and the forces that still make this a threat to modern societies. Readings will include modern studies on the nature and history of totalitarianism as well as primary sources from the cultures in question.

HHD-4011
Eco-History: Oil and Water, the 21st Century in Crisis
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course looks at two interrelated ecology issues that are central to how we will live during the 21st century: the oil-based economy and the world water supply. We will start with the history of the fossil fuels industry in the last century and its impact on past geo-political conflicts, current resource wars and the advent of global warming. How petrochemicals and climate change are impacting the world’s clean water supply, spurring “water wars” between nations, corporations and people will then be examined. Lastly, the course will explore the environmental alternatives and political choices before us, on both a global and a personal scale, as we enter this era of conflict and crisis.

HHD-4041
American Interventions from Vietnam to Iraq
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
After World War II, the United States began a policy of engagement and intervention that continues to the present day. As a result, American soldiers have fought and died in controversial wars around the globe. We will examine American military interventions in Vietnam, Bosnia, Somalia and Iraq, as well as American involvement in regime changes in Iran and Chile. How did America become involved in each of these conflicts? Were they morally justifiable or in our national interests? What have been the long-term consequences of this tradition of interventionism?

HHD-4122
History of Classical Greece and Rome
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The legacy of the Greek and Roman civilizations extends into our modern world. In this survey we will examine the rise of the Greek city-states and their political and artistic development, ending with the growth of Hellenistic culture. We will then turn our attention to the growth of Rome, from its mythic roots through the Republican era, the rise of the Caesars and the political, religious and artistic achievements of the empire. The course will conclude with an investigation of the factors that contributed to the eventual decline and fall of the Roman Empire.

HHD-4288
Society and Nature: A Historical Perspective
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course explores the varied and evolving relationships between human societies and the natural environment since the Renaissance. Topics of study will include: the “meaning” of nature and our place within it; conceptions of nature in Judeo-Christian, pagan, Taoist and other belief systems; the impact of the scientific and industrial revolutions on nature and society; theories and practices of conservation and ecology in the 19th and 20th centuries; and current conceptions of environmental crisis. Related issues such as capitalism and socialism will also be considered.

HHD-4333
African-American History I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will trace the histories and experiences of African-Americans in the United States from 1619 to 1865, covering the Colonial period, antebellum period and the Civil War. It will focus on the social, historical and political development of the African-American family and community. Texts will include: Jacqueline Jones, Labors of Love, Labors of Sorrow; John Hope Franklin, From Slavery to Freedom; Joanne Grant, Black Protest.

HHD-4334
African-American History II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will begin with an examination of Reconstruction and the backlash against it. We will then explore the lives, philosophical views and major contributions of Booker T. Washington; W.E.B. DuBois; Marcus Garvey; Martin Luther King, Jr.; Malcolm X; Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.; Paul Robeson and Thurgood Marshall. The social and historical ramifications of World War I, World War II, the Depression, the Harlem Renaissance, the NAACP, CORE, SNCC, SCLS and the Black Panther Party will also be considered.

HHD-4348
The Wealth and Poverty of Nations
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Although world peace and stability in the 21st century will depend heavily on achieving a more equitable distribution of global wealth, the disparity between the world’s rich and poor nations has never been so great, and, in fact, continues to increase even as the need to resolve this inequality grows ever more pressing. How have we arrived at this dilemma? Have first-world nations created their own wealth, or have they stolen it from others? Have some nations always been poor, or have they been impoverished? Do wealth and poverty result from decisions freely made by each nation’s political and business leaders, or are they the result of larger social, economic and cultural dynamics? Is there a way out of the deepening crisis? This course will address these and related questions in light of the historical processes that have led to the development of a world of rich and poor nations. We shall also attempt to evaluate the relative merits of various solutions that have been proposed to resolve this dilemma.

HHD-4356
Renaissance and Reformation
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The foundations of modern culture lay in both the dazzling culture of the Renaissance and in the religious agony of the Reformation. This course explores these two profound cultural movements in Western history. These movements include the rejection of medieval views and values in favor of more individualistic and cosmopolitan ideals. They also include fundamental challenges to traditional religious beliefs, common assumptions about society and politics, and challenges to traditional authorities. In considering the Renaissance, we will examine the contributions of humanist scholarship in the evolution of Renaissance culture. In considering the Reformation, we will examine the break up of Christianity into many separate churches and sects. In both, we will explore each of these movements by considering the larger socio-political context of the age. Our focus will be on cultural artifacts such as artistic and literary works and how they convey contemporary ideas and issues. Readings include contemporary sources as well as recent historical studies.

HHD-4397
Genocides
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
From the gas chambers of Auschwitz to the villages of Rwanda, the 20th century has been a century of genocides. This course will try to understand how mass extermination can ever be a goal, and why cries of “never again” have failed to stop it from reoccurring again and again. The course will cover the Nazi destruction of Europe’s Jews in World War II, the Hutu slaughter of the Tutsi in Rwanda, Serbian militias killing Muslims in Bosnia, and other examples of ethnic mass murder. We will use first-person accounts of genocide, such as Primo Levi’s Survival in Auschwitz and Philip Gourevitich’s book on Rwanda, We Wish To Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families, as well as secondary sources.

Literature 

HLD-2042
20th-Century Literature and Culture I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will focus on the literary, philosophical and intellectual background of the 20th century. Topics for the fall semester will include Victorian culture, existentialism, social Darwinism, the Freudian tradition and the jazz age. We will discuss the works of Dostoevsky, T. S. Eliot, Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, and John Steinbeck, among others.

HLD-2043
20th-Century Literature and Culture II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course is a continuation of 20th-Century Literature and Culture I. Cultural themes and movements will include the beat generation, feminism, black nationalism, the peace movement, the global village concept and the convergence of Eastern and Western cultures. Writers will include: James Baldwin, Albert Camus, Angela Davis, Bob Dylan, Jean-Paul Sartre, John Updike, Malcolm X.

HLD-2058
Fantasy
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Shaped by our desires and fears, fantasy literature offers radical departures from consensus reality into worlds of magic, peril and delight. This course will explore the imagery, characters, themes and narrative structures of several types of fantasy fiction. We will begin by briefly examining parent genres before reading examples of modern fantasy types, including heroic, surrealist, magic realism, science fiction and feminist. In addition to the fiction, we will read some critical theory to help define and locate the subgenres of this large category of fiction.

HLD-2088
American Literature: 19th Century
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course explores the intellectual, cultural and literary roots and directions of American literature, from its Puritan, Gothic and Romantic origins through realist, transcendental and premodern tendencies late in the 19th century. We’ll read selected works by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Henry James and the utopian feminist Charlotte Perkins Gilman. We’ll investigate questions of style, genre, tradition and critical interpretation in relation to the blooming of American society and culture.

HLD-2089
American Literature: 20th Century
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will plot the legacies and outgrowths of modernism, from its inception with imagism, surrealism and societal critique, through the Harlem Renaissance to the wartime epic novel, reactive 1960s beat confessional, to contemporary poetry and prose, especially rich in ethnic and literary diversity. We’ll read Jack London, Robert Frost, Djuna Barnes, William Faulkner, Langston Hughes, Ernest Hemingway, Sylvia Plath, William Carlos Williams and Toni Morrison, carving out a sense of what America has been, is, or may come to be, from the perspective of its great writers. Research papers, oral reports and abstracts will focus on each student’s particular interests within this survey of distinct traditions, perspectives and possibilities.

HLD-2154
Myths and the Cosmos
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
A study of some of the world’s ancient religious myths of creation, the cosmos, and man’s role within it, as contrasted with the universe of modern science. Among the mythologies to be considered are those of the Egyptians, Hebrews, Indians, Chinese and Greeks. Texts will include: Homer’s Odyssey (E.V. Rieu translation, Penguin paperback); Plato’s Symposium (B. Jowett translation, many editions); John Updike’s The Centaur; The Epic of Gilgamesh.

HLD-2161
The Beat Generation
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore the beat counterculture as a post-World War II American phenomenon, a literary correlative to abstract expressionist painting and to bebop music, auguring the “era” of sex, drugs and rock & roll to follow.

HLD-2201
Drama and Society
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course traces the history of drama and the interaction of drama with the society in which it is created. The course will emphasize modern and contemporary works, but will trace the rise of drama from ancient Greece to the present day. Students will view plays, either on tape or in live performance. Among the playwrights whose works will be read are: Euripides, Plautus, Molière, Ibsen, Shakespeare, Shaw, O’Neill, Ionesco, Beckett, Kopit and Mamet.

HLD-2211
Introduction to Poetry
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
We do not like that which we do not understand. As Marianne Moore wrote: “I too, dislike it: there are things that are important beyond all this fiddle. Reading it, however, with a perfect contempt for it, one discovers in it after all, a place for the genuine.” This course will concentrate on the close reading of a wide variety of poems—ballads, nursery rhymes, sonnets and contemporary lyrics—and will attempt to focus on the genuine aspects of the poet’s craft and vision. Students will be encouraged to attend poetry readings, and guest poets will be invited to the class. Texts include: Perrine, Sound and Sense; O. Williams ed., Modern Verse; T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land and Other Poems.

HLD-2223
Short Fiction I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
In many respects, the short story is more like a play than a novel. Its brevity, immediacy, concentration on character and compression of plot enable it, in the hands of a master, to profoundly affect the reader. Some of the best literary work of the last century has been in the form of short stories. Writers we will study include: Leo Tolstoy, Herman Melville, Anton Chekhov, James Joyce, Franz Kafka and Ernest Hemingway.

HLD-2224
Short Fiction II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Some of the finest literary work of the last 100 years has been in the form of short fiction. In this course, we will study the short stories and novellas of such writers as Raymond Carver, J.D. Salinger, Jorge Luis Borges, John Updike, Joyce Carol Oates and Tillie Olsen.

HLD-2313
Erotic Literature
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will focus on selections from the great erotic literature from ancient Greece to modern times. Topics will include social attitudes about sex; the distinction between pornography and erotica; feminist issues, including exploitation and political relationships between men and women; erotica and censorship. We will read and discuss the works of Anaïs Nin, Henry Miller, D. H. Lawrence, Marquis de Sade, Chaucer, Boccaccio and Aristophanes.

HLD-2565
American Theater
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will introduce students to key playwrights and stage artists of the American theater from the 1930s to the present. Assigned readings will include plays by Eugene O’Neill, Clifford Odets, Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Edward Albee, David Mamet, August Wilson, Sam Shepard and Tony Kushner. Video screenings of important productions by these authors will be included.

HLD-2677
Fiction of the 19th Century I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
We will read short stories and one or two short novels by selected writers such as Wilde, Gogol, Mérimée, Tolstoy and Hoffmann, exploring such psychological and emotional themes as love, sin, madness and death. Attention will be paid to the interrelations of the literature and art of the period—Romanticism, realism and symbolism. Videos will supplement course material.

HLD-2678
Fiction of the 19th Century II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course is a further exploration of some of the themes and movements of fiction of the 19th century offered in Fiction of the 19th Century I. Readings will include selections from the novels and short stories of, among others, Dostoevsky, Anderson, Poe, Shelley, Hugo and Hawthorne. Videos will supplement course material.

HLD-2922
Medieval English Literature
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The medieval age was a period of extraordinary literary flowering in Europe. Themes like heroism, religion, courtly love and chivalry became popular as the institutions that supported them rose and fell. The result was a literature full of contradictions, at once spiritual and bawdy, romantic and cynical. Readings will include Beowulf; selected Anglo-Saxon heroic verse; Dante’s Inferno; selections from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; John Gardner’s Grendel; and Hesse’s Narcissus and Goldmund.

HLD-2950
Modern Drama
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will introduce students to the foundation of present-day theater. While attention will be paid to directors, actors and stage artists, the emphasis is on the playwright. The concentration will be on the realistic movement and will cover such dramatists as Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov and O’Neill.

HLD-2977
Shakespeare I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will provide the student with a selective, chronological overview of Shakespeare, the dramatist. Plays assigned will include a selection of his comedies, histories and early tragedies.

HLD-2978
Shakespeare II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will provide the student with a selective, chronological overview of Shakespeare, the dramatist. Plays assigned will include the four major tragedies and one of the final romances.

HLD-3007
The One-Act Play
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Most plays are either read as literature or used as vehicles for actors to perform. This course offers both. We will first study plays from a literary point of view by analyzing and discussing plot, character, language, cultural and philosophical implications. Next, we will approach the text as actors using various techniques, including improvisation. Selected scenes will be explored, from plays studied and through the power of performance as we seek to uncover a deeper understanding of both their human and dramatic significance. The playwrights studied include Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Adrienne Kennedy, Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter, Eugène Ionesco, Caryl Churchill, Yasmina Reza, Sam Shepherd, Paula Vogel and Suzan-Lori Parks. This course is for anyone interested in exploring the special environment where work and action become one.

HLD-3011
The Anatomy of Hell
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
From mankind’s very beginnings, human beings have pondered the nature of the afterlife. Although the concept of heaven inspires us, it is the notion of hell that truly fires our imaginations. This course, drawing on readings ranging from the Egyptian Book of the Dead all the way to episodes from Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone, will explore numerous conjectures concerning hell, the devil and the afterlife. Readings include Dante’s Inferno, selections from Milton’s Paradise Lost, Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus, Sartre’s No Exit and David Mamet’s Oh Hell!

HLD-3026
Comparative Literature: Great Books
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course explores some of the more influential European and American literary and poetic works written between the turn of the 20th century and World War II. The modern period was rich for writers, stimulating participation in both political struggles of the age and its anxiety-ridden debates about progress. Class discussions will focus on how these works respond, both formally and thematically, to pervasive social transformation. We will read works by Baudelaire, Wilde, Kafka, Stein, Crane, Camus, Beckett, Levi, Baroka and Lorca.

HLD-3033
Art and Revolution I: The Working-Class Hero
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The multicultural revolution has deepened and broadened our understanding of gender, race, sexual preference and international culture. Unfortunately, we have tended to ignore one crucial factor that cuts across all areas of human experience: socioeconomic class. This course will focus on the art, literature and struggles of working-class people during the past two centuries. Readings will be selected from fictional works such as Zola’s Germinal, Gorky’s My Childhood, Sillitoe’s The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, Wright’s Black Boy, Tillie Olsen’s Tell Me a Riddle. In conjunction with the readings we will view and discuss the paintings of artists such as Courbet, Millet, Daumier, Kollwitz, the Russian social realists and the American Ashcan School. Selected videos will be screened and discussed.

HLD-3034
Art and Revolution II: The Rebel
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The landscape of history has periodically been illuminated by apocalyptic struggles to change society, reinvent the world and re-create human nature. In this course, we will explore the literature of social revolt and political revolution. Readings will be selected from authors such as Maxim Gorky, André Malraux, Arthur Rimbaud, Marge Piercy, Bertolt Brecht, Albert Camus, Mariano Azuela and Malcolm X. In conjunction with the readings, we will view and discuss selected works of such artists as Diego Rivera, Siquieros, Eisenstein, Orozco and Frida Kahlo. Selected videos will be screened and discussed.

HLD-3051
Literature of Self-Knowledge
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course draws upon fiction, film and art to explore the romantic self, the existential self, the transcendental self, the classical view of self and the divided self in order to answer the question “Who Am I?” We will read On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are, Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Apology of Socrates, as well as view such films as The Up Series, Three Faces of Eve, Seconds and The Picture of Dorian Gray. We will also discuss art, in particular, self-portraits and “selfies.”

HLD-3341
20th-Century Italian Literature
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The Italian literary tradition didn’t end abruptly with the Renaissance. Many of the greatest novels of the last century were written by Italian authors, writers who fought for or against Fascism, participated in the desperate struggles between labor and capital, took their stand on the issues of anti-Semitism, racism and sexism. Their names may sound obscure to readers of modern fiction—Berto, Morante, D’Annunzio, Pirandello, Levi, Silone—yet we neglect them to our own detriment—politically, morally and aesthetically. This course will explore their work, together with major films of the Italian neorealist cinema.

HLD-3367
Modern Japanese Literature in Translation
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will examine Japanese literature of the modern period, which began with the Meiji Restoration in 1868. This dramatic period marked the end of the feudal era and Japan’s subsequent transformation into an industrialized nation that could compete with its Western counterparts. Topics will include the profound influence that this transformation has had on Japanese society and its people, the conflicts between traditional Japanese values and Western values, and the changing conceptions of identity and gender relations. We will read such works as Natsume’s Kokoro, Enchi’s The Waiting Years, Tanizaki’s Naomi, Abe’s The Face of Another, Ibuse’s Black Rain and Murakami’s A Wilde Sheep Chase.

HLD-3477
Children’s Literature for Illustrators
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Illustrators will gain an appreciation of the writer’s craft and of the various possible relations between pictures and words in a children’s book. We will read as literature works by Aesop, E.B. White, Maurice Sendak, Lewis Carroll, Roald Dahl, Lois Lowery, Mildred Taylor, and others. Narrative voice, the visual element in language and other topics will be discussed throughout a survey of the best children’s books, past and present.

HLD-3501
Tragedy
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
What are the common and unique features of tragic works? Is there a universal definition of tragedy? Is tragedy a realistic appraisal of the human condition? These and other questions will be explored as we come to grips with works that confront the underlying possibilities and limitations of the human condition. Readings will include: The Bacchae, Euripides; Timon of Athens and King Lear, Shakespeare; Peer Gynt, Ibsen; Lord Jim, Conrad; The Iceman Cometh, Eugene O’Neill; A View from the Bridge, Arthur Miller.

HLD-3514
Radical and Revolutionary American Literature
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will provide an overview of radical and revolutionary American literature from the American Revolution to the present day. We will read and discuss the works of such authors and artists as Thomas Paine, Allen Ginsberg, Abraham Lincoln, Malcolm X, Walt Whitman, Tillie Olsen, Jack London, Woody Guthrie and Bruce Springsteen. A major focus will be on working-class fiction and reality in light of the economic depression and cultural diversity of the 20th century.

HLD-3521
From Aristophanes to Woody Allen: An Introduction to the Arts and Forms of Comedy
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
It is well known that dying is easy, but comedy is hard. And nothing can be more difficult than trying to explain what makes us laugh. Still we laugh, and our laughter proves us human. This course traces the history of comedy, starting in Greece with the plays of Aristophanes and concluding with a look at the contemporary scene in film, television and print. Along the way, we will read Plautus, Chaucer, Shaw, Shakespeare, Thurber, Ionesco and Beckett. Screenings will include films by Chaplin, Keaton and Woody Allen. We will read such essays as The Mythos of Spring: Comedy, Northrup Frye; The Comic Rhythm, Susanne Lange; and Comedy, Christopher Fry. We will consider comedic forms such as satire, parody, burlesque, theater of the absurd, romantic comedy, sitcoms and tragicomedy.

HLD-3553
Images of Artists: Definitions of Culture from the 19th Century to the Present
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
What is culture and how do we know when we are experiencing it? What are the effects of not having access to culture? This course will look at how different depictions of the artist help shape our conceptions of what culture is and of the codes by which we identify what is “valuable” and “meaningful” in our world. We will trace various characterizations of the artist. From the conscience of society to voices of dissension and avant-gardism, artists are, variously, misunderstood or championed. Paying particular attention to biographies and novels about artists’ lives, we will examine how ideas of culture and the artist are constructed and debated through literature, film and video. Texts will include: Mary Gordon, Spending: A Utopian Divertimento; Gertrude Stein, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas; Emile Zola, The Masterpiece; Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; short stories by Edgar Allan Poe; selections from the diaries of Frida Kahlo, Anne Truitt and Virginia Woolf; and Vincent van Gogh’s letters. Screening of films like Martin Scorsese’s Life Lessons, Ed Harris’s Pollock, Vincent Minnelli’s Lust for Life, and Robert Altman’s Vincent and Theo will be included.

HLD-3566
Civilization and Its DiscontentsOne semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course explores the themes of civilization and the discontents of individuals within modern society. It focuses on the particular role that the artist and art plays within this relationship. Theoretical writings, literature, film and art will be examined historically as well as critically and aesthetically. Freud’s Civilization and Its Discontents is the primary textbook for this semester. Among additional theoretical sources are essays by Susan Sontag, Sigmund Freud and Donald Kuspit. Among the literary texts and films are: The Remains of the Day, Ishiguro; The Lover, Duras; Swept Away, Wertmuller, and American Beauty, Sam Mendes.

HLD-3951
Literature and Psychoanalysis I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore how an author’s unconscious memories, wishes, fears and fantasies shape his/her fictional and philosophical world. Various psychoanalytic approaches will be evaluated and applied to an understanding of the writer and his/her characters. Readings will be illustrated by clinical case material. Topics will include: pathological types and defenses, dreams and the unconscious, the history of psychoanalysis, trauma and creativity, and the relationship of the writer/artist to the work. We will read theorists such as Freud, Jung, Alice Miller and Winnicott and writers such as Camus, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Kafka, Ozick and D.H. Lawrence.

HLD-3952
Literature and Psychoanalysis II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course focuses on normal psychological processes such as separation and individuation, the development of a sense of identity and the individual’s relationship to society. Readings include Mahler, Blos, Erikson and Laing, and such writers as Tennessee Williams, Woolf, Moravia, Ibsen and Strindberg.

HLD-3998
James Joyce
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The development of this modernist master, as he discovers his subject and evolves his style and voice, is the focus of this course. We will read the early fiction, Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and chapters from Ulysses. How Joyce develops his writing style in response to the literary renaissance in Ireland as well as the movements of modern art and literature in Europe will be explored. We will then observe how Joyce decenters his narrative voices and develops stream of consciousness narrative to explore the inner reality of his characters as his vision matures. Supplementary readings will help to shed light on his character and era. Against this backdrop, we’ll explore how Joyce crafts his work and creates his artistic self.

HLD-4022
Poetry and Art
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Since Baudelaire, innovative poets have often exercised important influence on avant-garde visual artists, primarily through radical innovations of form and content in their poetry, but also as friends and, in some cases, major art critics as well. The course concentrates on the work of Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Mallarmé, Apollinaire and William Carlos Williams. Home assignments include readings to locate the poems against their literary and cultural background. There are also selected readings from the poets’ essays and art criticism. Primary emphasis is on the poetry, and the course also attempts to answer the questions: What accounts for the mutual interplay of influence between poetry and visual art? How does it work?

HLD-4044
Surrealist Literature
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Surrealism, a 20th-century movement begun by poets, attempted to unite the dream and waking worlds through art. The poets were later joined by visual artists whose works they influenced, both as critics and as friends. The course studies the manifestos and poetry of such seminal precursors as F. T. Marinetti, the founder of futurism, and Tristan Tzara, the Dada animateur. André Breton, the “pope” of surrealism, is covered in detail, with close readings of his manifestos, poetry and fiction. We also read such poets as Jean Arp, Paul Eluard, Louis Aragon and Aimé Césaire. Sessions feature surrealist plays and films, and discussions of visual artists associated with the movement. Translations by the instructor are included.

HLD-4122
18th-Century Fiction I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore the age of eroticism, the birth of Romanticism and the development of the great satiric tradition in Western literature. We will read short works by great 18th-century authors such as Swift, Voltaire, Goethe, and the Marquis de Sade—the man who wrote the definitive manual of sexual depravity. Video screenings will supplement readings and discussions.

HLD-4123
18th-Century Fiction II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore the themes of passion, horror, revolution and fantasy through 18th-century fiction. Readings will include a trip to the moon with Baron Munchausen (early science fiction and fantasy), and the great 18th-century erotic novels Fanny Hill and Dangerous Liaisons. Videos will supplement readings and discussions.

HLD-4152
20th-Century Irish Literature
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore how, through literature, 20th-century Ireland has dealt with its losses and forged its identity. The course will cover the Irish Literary Renaissance, the founding of the Abbey Theater, Joyce’s efforts to give Ireland a voice and situate it within the mainstream aesthetic movements of Europe, Yeats’ delving into folklore and spirituality, as well as more recent writers’ explorations into such questions as cultural identity. We will read the work of fiction writers, playwrights, and poets such as: W. B. Yeats, James Joyce, J. M. Synge, Sean O’Casey, Flann O’Brien, Samuel Beckett, Patrick Kavanagh, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland, Mary Lavin and Tom Murphy.

HLD-4162
Existential Origins
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will investigate the literature of the artists and thinkers who fundamentally question the meaning of our existence in the absence of an absolute faith, philosophical system or political ideology—artists who believe that we share sole responsibility for our alienation and our freedom. By selecting from Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Kafka, Gide and Malraux, we will examine the origins of what is retrospectively called existentialism wherein the individual acts without an ethical or metaphysical blueprint to define who one is or what one might choose, or why. This impasse, which Camus metaphorically called “the desert” and Nietzsche diagnosed conceptually as nihilism posits the vision of a world in which it is our challenge to create new truths and more life out of nothing. We will begin the course with Beauvoir’s affirmation of the existential freedom of women.

HLD-4177
French Existentialism
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The influence of French existentialism is global, but not everyone has read the novels, plays and philosophic essays that challenged the recurring myth (that we are mere victims of fate, environment or history). Existentialists maintain that we make our own lives through fundamental choices, trying to avoid self-deception and living with the anxiety (angst) of having nothing determining what we do. The stark simplicity of this philosophy, when translated into literature by Sartre, Malraux, Camus, de Beauvoir and Beckett, unites original philosophy with artistic freedom. While the Germans Husserl and Heidegger offer the first existentialist philosophic inquiry, the French gave our urban alienation a human face, enticing us back to the barricades, engaged with social justice, leading us to face the uncanniness of our struggle as individuals, despite the absurdity of our existence to create a meaning for our lives on earth.

HLD-4193
Literature of Love
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The exploration of love relationships and values of various cultures and times is the focus of this course. Beginning with an examination of ancient attitudes toward love in the works of Aristophanes, Sappho, Plato, Greek Anthology and Ovid, we then consider the influence of courtly love and Christianity on attitudes of love with excerpts from Dante, Shakespeare and Donne. Lastly, we will address modern conceptions of love in Flaubert, D. H. Lawrence, Proust and Toni Morrison. The following works will be read in full: Clouds, The Symposium, The Art of Love, Madame Bovary, Women in Love, Swann’s Way, Love.

HLD-4199
Antiheroes and Villains in Literature
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
What are villains and why do we love them so much? This course will examine the literary device of “the villain” and the emergence of the antihero in literature. We will read representative texts by such authors as: Sophocles, Shakespeare, Dante, Dostoevsky, Beckett and Hammett.

HLD-4288
Politics and Literature
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore how great writers have dramatized and/or promoted various political philosophies in their work. We will examine questions such as: What is the best form of government? What are the appropriate means to achieve political ends? and What is the relationship between elites and the masses? Readings in the course will include works by: Plato, Machiavelli, Shaw, Brecht, Orwell, Camus and Malraux.

HLD-4312
Modern Literary Survey: India and Asia
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This world literary survey will focus on the best-known and most influential writers of India and Asia. The enormous changes of the 20th century have produced literatures that uniquely blend traditional cultural forms with new styles and content. Readings will include short stories, novels and essays from such authors as Kobo Abe, Yukio Mishima, Lu Xun, Lao She, Salmon Rushdie, B. Bandopadhyay and V. S. Naipaul.

HLD-4322
20th-Century American Novel
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Throughout the 20th century, American novelists provided some of the most insightful commentary on the political, social and cultural conditions of America and the world. This course will examine such authors as Faulkner, Hemingway and Fitzgerald who dominated the literary landscape of the first half of the century. It will also examine writers of the latter 20th century such as Bellow, Barth and Morrison.

HLD-4372
At the Crossroads: Utopia or Dystopia?
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The term “utopia” is generally associated with Sir Thomas More whose famous work portrayed an idealized island kingdom representing what a perfect society might look like. Although, ironically, utopia stems from the Greek ou topos, which suggests “no place.” The tradition of reaching for exemplary values and the common good has been and continues to be the highest of human aspirations. Unfortunately, this ideal vision inevitably suggests the harsh contrast of the dystopia, a vision of totalitarian repression and severe limitations on the human spirit. Can there be a society of radical reform and dramatic progress? Or will this society, left unexamined and unchecked, become a dangerous and terrifying nightmare future? This course will explore this question with reference to literature and films, such as Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Lathe of Heaven, George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, Robert Edwards’s Land of the Blind and Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange.

Social Sciences 

Philosophy and Cultural Studies

HPD-2044
Art Theory: From Modernism to Postmodernism
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course is an introduction to the philosophical ideas that have shaped the practice of contemporary art and criticism in the West. We begin with an examination of some historical problems that have arisen in thinking about art. Then we survey the various systems that constitute modernist cultural “theory,” including formalism, phenomenology, Marxism, structuralism, semiotics and psychoanalysis. These modernist theories are compared to poststructuralist and feminist views of art production and reception. The overall objective is to provide the necessary background for understanding and evaluating contemporary theories of art and design. Required texts: Stephen David Ross, ed., Art and Its Significance: An Anthology of Aesthetic Theory; Terry Eagleton, Literary Theory; Harrison and Wood, eds., Art in Theory: 1900-1990.

HPD-2047
Magic, Symbolism, Modernism and Art
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
What is a mystic, a magician, a seer, a charlatan, a scientist, an artist? When do poetry, art, emotion and science collide? This course explores the themes of magic and science as they relate to the movements of symbolism and modernism in 19th- and 20th-century literature, philosophy, art and art theory. We will examine Edgar Allan Poe’s definition of the infinite universe, Nikola Tesla’s scientific achievements in electrical discoveries, Harry Houdini’s sleight-of-hand tricks, the films of Georges Méliès and Jean Painleve, and the art of Pablo Picasso. Readings from literature, scientific articles, philosophy and art theory will be complemented with films and demonstrations.

HPD-2267
African Art and Civilization
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The aims of this course are to study the traditional art of specific ethnic groups and to explore artistic variations from Africa, parts of the Americas, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Haiti and the continental United States. We will examine Dogon symbols and Bobo/Bwa, Guro, Senufo, Baule, Kingdoms of life, Fon, Benin, Yoruba, Congo, Bakuba, as well as Gabon, Cameroon, Cross Niger/Igbo Nigeria. South Africa, Zimbabwe. We will also look at African contemporary art, including modern film that contrasts modernity with antiquity.

HPD-2411
The Female Gaze
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
We will look at artists whose vision has been clearly shaped by an awareness that what we see is conditioned by who we are, and that our sexuality and personal histories play significant roles in the forming of our artistic statements. We will study artists like Sofonisba Anguissola, Hannah Hoch, Louise Bourgeois, Eva Hesse, Mary Kelly, Adrian Piper, Lorna Simpson, Sophie Calle, Shirin Neshat and Louisa Matthíasdóttir in light of such questions as: How does gender relate to art? How is this relationship reflected in history? What is the relationship between the rise of the women’s movement and art? What is feminist art? We will also look at the collaborative group known as the Guerrilla Girls. Language, identity and autobiographical impulses are among the topics to be discussed and integrated through readings in Ways of Seeing, John Berger, and Manifesta, Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards. We will also examine the history of the women’s movement and the feminist art movement through selected essays by John Stuart Mill and Harriet Taylor Mill, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Linda Nochlin, Lucy Lippard, Betty Friedan and Michelle Wallace.

HPD-2422
Art and Politics
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
An examination of the role of political art in history including Goya’s Disasters of War and Caprichos, Picasso’s Guernica, and Käthe Kollwitz’s antiwar woodcuts, posters and other graphic work. How do artists respond to the social upheavals of their times? What is the artist’s responsibility to these concerns and what is the responsibility to one’s craft and to the development of a personal statement? Readings will be supplemented by film, video and field trips.

HPD-2687
Metaphysics
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Metaphysics is the study of the world in its entirety. The metaphysician attempts to understand reality as a kind of a whole, attempts to answer not the how’s, but the why’s of life; producing a map that, hopefully, captures with genuine insight what the seer leaves as inspired intuition. The map’s legends are identity, potentiality, universals, time, mind, beauty, freedom and their cosmological adhesion is its paper. The course is designed to introduce the intermediary student to exploratory touring of the territory with classical and contemporary maps. Texts will include: Metaphysics, Aristotle; Monadology, Leibniz; Foundations, Kant; Metaphysics, Hamlyn.

HPD-2931
The Mythology of War
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Perhaps an understanding of institutionalized violence and man’s inhumanity to man has never been more important than in the troubled times in which we live. In this course, we will explore the philosophical and psychological foundations of the allure of war. While many studies of war and its causes look to states and institutions, here we turn our attention to what might be called the “mythology of war.” Simply put, despite its costs—both human and economic—war and battle have an enduring appeal that defies rational understanding. Our task will be to probe the depths of the human experience in war and battle so as to better comprehend this appeal. We will consider the claim that man is by nature a warrior or, as a consequence of an innate lust for destruction, naturally driven to killing and violence. To guide us in this endeavor, we will study the insights offered in such texts as Michael Gelvin’s War and Existence, A Philosophical Inquiry; Stephen Pressfield’s Gates of Fire, An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae; Glenn Gray’s The Warriors: Reflections on Men in Battle; Dave Grossman’s On Killing: The Psychological Cast of Learning to Kill in War and Society and Jonathan Shay’s Achilles in Vietnam.

HPD-2998
The Philosophy of Mind
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The philosophy of mind concerns itself with the human—and perhaps nonhuman—mental, intellectual and spiritual awareness of the “world,” broadly conceived. This course begins with an attempt to define typical mental states, such as perceiving, knowing and desiring, and then consider such issues as the mind-body problem and our knowledge of other minds. Contemporary questions will explore the relationship of thought and language, the possibility of artificial intelligence, the intelligence of animals, moral action and free will. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their thought processes as a source of phenomena that a coherent theory of mind must account for.

HPD-3013
Madness and Creativity
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
When is madness a cry for independence, a revelation of alienated creativity, or an invitation to the frontiers of human experience, and when is it a retreat into repetition, nihilism and silence? At what point do we confuse the authentic suffering of the mind with genius or originality? Does creativity include the risk madness to become what Rimbaud called a “seer” or visionary, or might this play into a dangerously conventional myth? Our project is to venture into the universe of the imagination to separate the myth of madness from the freedom to create. We will select psychological and philosophic works from Nietzsche, Freud, Foucault and Laing, as well as explore the literature of Rimbaud, Stevenson, Gogol, Gilman, Artaud and Plath. Required texts: The Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche; Madness and Civilization, Foucault; A Season in Hell, Rimbaud; The Divided Self, R. D. Laing; Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Stevenson; The Uncanny, Freud; The Yellow Wallpaper, Gilman.

HPD-3024
Art, Ethics and Moral Responsibility
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course is an introduction to philosophic reasoning about some basic ethical questions of human life. We will begin by exploring the moral notions of right and wrong, and whether there are rational ways for determining the difference between them. In particular, we will examine the nature and the application of moral standards to our personal behavior and especially to our artistic pursuits. In addition, we will consider whether there is a philosophical basis for moral responsibility, action and commitment, and whether such concepts will impact our freedom of expression. Among the authors and artists to be considered will be Immanuel Kant, W.D. Ross, Alasdair MacIntyre, Andre Serrano and Jock Sturges.

HPD-3123
The Philosophy of Human Nature
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Since Darwin shook the belief in divine provenance, philosophers and scientists have sought a new theory of human nature—or have denied such a thing is possible. This course begins with a study of classic sources of humankind’s picture of itself—in Plato, the Bible, the Upanishads and Confucianism. Modern theories reflect on the human being as a respondent organism, a genetic mechanism, a maker of tools, a seeker of God, a creator of art, the destroyer of its own habitat, and even as the slayer of its own species. Contemporary readings will include reflections by Marx, Skinner, Dawkins, Freud, Lorenz and Sartre.

HPD-3133
Nietzsche: Nihilism and Freedom
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Nietzsche has inspired much of what is essential to 20th-century thought. Existentialists, expressionists, Freudian and Jungian psychotherapists, deconstructionists—even positivists and futurists—have claimed him as their forerunner. Yet, while key to all this ferment, Nietzsche is more than a Rorschach test for novel ideas. The confusion is understandable—Nietzsche is not only an accurate and comprehensive philosopher, but also a poet and visionary. This course will seek to interpret the core of his thought and his contribution to modern aesthetic, ethical and psychological theory, through an exploration of his statements on art, truth and perception, as well as his metaphors, humor and epigrams. We will study such works as The Birth of Tragedy, Beyond Good and Evil, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, The Case Against Wagner and Twilight of the Idols, to examine the interplay between metaphoric and conceptual language, and between poetry and philosophy. Our goal will be to recover Nietzsche’s ideas from his legend, and to understand a thinker who defies categorization, schools and systems, for intellectual integrity and individual freedom.

HPD-3201
Noticing and Awe
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Our consciousness is itself a “miracle.” Noticing our existence enables us to make art and be creative, but rarely are we in awe of it. This course will pose the most fundamental of questions (Why are we here?) to investigate this first enigma: How and why do we lose our fundamental gratitude for existence? And how does art reflect back to the origins of our perception to return us to wonder, to inspire to us, to notice with awe? Beginning with Taoism, Buddhism and the philosophy of Heidegger, we will explore Plato’s Phaedrus, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, and the poetry of Rimbaud, Rilke and Dickinson, and discuss revealing extracts on the subject drawn from astronomy, music and the visual arts. Required texts include: Tao Te Ching, Lao Tzu; The Way of Zen, Alan Watts; Poetry, Language, Thought, Martin Heidegger; Duino Elegies, Rainer Maria Rilke.

HPD-3221
Philosophy: Our Pursuit of Wisdom
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Philosophy, the love of wisdom, rose from the waking dreams of myth to challenge us to think clearly and freely as individuals, to examine and question but also to ponder and muse. From its dawn among the ancient Greeks in the West, from India and China in the East, from radically different perspectives and cultures to the present, it offers theoretic inquiry and alternative ways to live. We will choose philosophers and thinkers who seek to understand and aspire to authentic experience as a path to wisdom. From the pre-Socratics and Plato to the Roman Stoics, from the Chinese Taoists to the great essayists, including Montaigne, Emerson and Thoreau, and selections from Nietzsche, Buber, Merton, Arendt and the Dalai Lama. Finally, the course will explore how knowledge and experience suffused by intuition can illumine our contemporary global experience—in pursuit of wisdom.

HPD-3342
Philosophy of the Sexes and Racism
Wednesday 3:00-5:50
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
We will study how various art works, performances, music, films, inquiries and textual forms, including fiction and memoir, mediate ways authors, artists, audiences and scholars think about sexism, racism and heterosexism, and other kinds of power relations. Topics, texts, authors, artists include: Louis Armstrong; “male” and “female” in Western thought; films by Marlon Riggs (Black Is…Black Ain’t and Ethnic Notions); art, music and filmed performances by Ethel Waters, Nina Simone, Zora Neale Hurston, Adrian Piper; artist Pam Tom’s independent fiction film Two Lies, and related anthropological and visual analyses by Eugenia Kaw and Kathleen Zane, regarding “Asian eye” operations; Ruth Frankenberg on “color evasion”; whiteness; Paula Giddings’s The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America; critical race theory; Judith Butler; the film Who Killed Vincent Chin (1988); feminist inquiries about rape; Women of Color anti-racist feminist thinkers Patricia Williams, bell hooks, Deborah King, Aida Hurtado, Barbara Omolade; civil rights movement films; a short story by Alice Walker; and Luce Irigaray. This is a foundational course for future study of any forms of oppression. A class project will be to study, create and develop strategies of “difference thinking.” This project will be informed by our study of Women of Color feminist thought.

HPD-3343
Sexuality, Race and Representation
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Artists think through sexuality, race and representation issues embodied in art and we will study such artworks from various perspectives of anti-racist feminist thought. Framed by Fatimah Tobing Rony’s ‘third eye’ concept in her The Third Eye: Race, Cinema, & Ethnographic Spectacle, we study Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye (1970) set in 1941, bell hooks’s Black Looks: Race & Representation, Julie Dash’s early film Illusions (1983) set in 1941, and related blues and swing (including Bessie Smith, Ethel Waters and Ella Fitzgerald); Helen Lee’s 1990 fiction video Sally’s Beauty Spot, the 1950s Hollywood film The World of Susie Wong and related American music in film (“As Time Goes By” in Casablanca); performances by David Mura; the Whitney Museum 1994 art exhibit “Black Male”; the 1970s feminist art movement and its legacies; women’s art, minimalism and surrealism; feminist debates about prostitution embodied in Lizzie Borden’s classic film Working Girls (1984), in feminist history, and in philosophy, engaged with Drucilla Cornell’s ‘imaginary domain’ concept. Some specific debates and ideas covered: the power of cinema, whiteness, looking and being looked at, passing, the social and aesthetic meanings of race, sex, beauty, music, performance, romantic love, good and evil, envy and hatred, stereotypes, split consciousness and resistance, fiction and truth.

HPD-3401
History of Problems in Social and Political Philosophy I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will critically examine the values and assumptions underlying governments and political systems. Students will examine and discuss philosophically, concepts such as liberty, justice, patriotism, nationalism, civil disobedience, democracy, social contract, and political rights. In addition, social problems such as war, poverty, economic inequality, and racism will be considered. Among the authors to be studied are Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, More, Thoreau and King.

HPD-3402
History of Problems in Social and Political Philosophy II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will critically examine the values and assumptions underlying governments and political systems. Students will examine and philosophically discuss concepts such as liberty, justice, patriotism, nationalism, civil disobedience, democracy, social contract and political rights. In addition, social problems such as war, poverty, economic inequality, racism, and speciesism will be considered. Among the authors to be studied are Hobbes, Locke, Marx, Singer, Rawls and Nozick.

HPD-3442
Semiotics I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Semiotics is the study of signs, both linguistic (speech and writing) and iconic (paintings, photographs, drawings, sculptures, etc.). Some texts will provide a background to the theory of semiotics while others will apply the theory and language of semiotics to contemporary aesthetics and current issues. Marshall Blonsky’s On Signs is one source of essays. In addition, we will read authors and look at texts that have had great influence in recent visual and musical thought, such as Ludwig Wittgenstein, Jonathan Ames, Roland Barthes, Thom Yorke, Maureen Dowd, Barack Obama, Kristen Schaal, Julia Kristeva, Sam Amidon, Jasper Johns, Sam Mendes, Carter Ratcliff, Steve Martin, Thomas McEvilley, Susan Sontag, Jon Stewart, Gail Collins, Bruce Nauman, Walter Benjamin, Jean Baudrillard, Dave Hickey and Steven Pinker, as well as excerpts from Umberto Eco’s Theory of Semiotics.

HPD-3443
Semiotics II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore the semiotics of iconic signs, paintings and photographs. We will examine the difference between iconic and linguistic signs, and focus on applied semiotics and the interconnection of sign systems: aesthetic, political and moral. Texts include: A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments and Elements of Semiology, Roland Barthes; The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution, Denis Dutton; Chromophobia, David Batchelor.

HPD-3451
Introduction to Asian Thought
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will introduce the diverse doctrines and practices of the Hindu and Buddhist traditions as they developed in ancient India and traveled to Tibet, China and Japan. Through scriptural texts we will explore Hinduism’s three spiritual paths: the Path of Action, the Path of Devotion and the Path of Knowledge. We will then examine how the Buddha’s radical reinterpretation of the meaning of self formed the basis of one of the most powerful spiritual and philosophical movements in history. The course will then focus on Japanese Zen Buddhism through the writings of its founders. We will conclude with a look at the forms that these traditional schools are now taking as they are transplanted into Western cultures. Readings include: Fenton’s Religions of Asia; Koller’s A Sourcebook in Asian Philosophy; Harvey’s An Introduction to Buddhism; Suzuki’s Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind.

HPD-3454
Aesthetics and the Modern Artist
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Why does art exist and what does it mean to human perception and our experience of the world? Why are we fascinated by beauty? What is the source of inspiration? What is the relationship of art to truth? This course is designed to explore the concepts of taste, beauty, expression, artistic judgment, genius and inspiration in the light of classical and contemporary aesthetic theory. Texts will include selections from philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, Heidegger and Sartre. We will also consider the contributions of poets, musicians and visual artists. Finally, this course will probe views of the political and social significance of creativity and assess their value in terms of history and the future.

HPD-3458
Ethics
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Is might right? Should majority rule? Does power corrupt? Does pluralism entail the abdication of values? Ethics is the rational analysis of morals, with no regard for fashion and political correctness, and can therefore both seek and find firm and objective answers to what is right, good, duty, justice and freedom in all corners of personal and social life. This course is not an issues menu or a survey of all possible positions, but a concentrated study of deontological, naturalistic and utilitarian ethics in classical texts and contemporary commentaries. The status of universal human rights will be addressed.

HPD-3466
Uncontrollable Beauty I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will focus on the nature of beauty, style and fashion, drawing upon contemporary critics and philosophers, and contrasts our modern notion of beauty with Victorian ideas like those of John Ruskin, Walter Pater and Oscar Wilde. We will discuss new philosophies of beauty from people like Dave Hickey, Versace, Frank Gehry, Jeremy Gilbert Rolfe and Jacqueline Lichtenstein. Uncontrollable Beauty is the primary text for the course.

HPD-3467
Uncontrollable Beauty II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
What defines the nature of beauty is the focus of this course. We will draw upon the views of contemporary critics, novelists and artists, and discuss the notion of cultural relativity and the modern artist’s affinity for so-called “primitive” art. This course will also examine the practice of beauty and art-making through the essays of artists, designers and writers like Agnes Martin, Kenneth Koch, Julia Kristeva, Steven Pinker, Stephen Colbert, Alexander McQueen and Louise Bourgeois. Uncontrollable Beauty and Sticky Sublime anthologies are the primary texts for the course.

HPD-3471
Media Criticism
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
What is the role of the media in our contemporary society? How does it interact with our conception of democracy? What is the difference between information and propaganda? How does thought control work in a democratic society? How can we detect bias, conflicts of interest, inaccuracy, censorship and “dumbing down”? What is the role of visual imagery in shaping our attitudes toward gender, race and class? This course will explore these questions through readings from such analysts as Noam Chomsky, Ben Bagdikian and Norman Solomon. We will also examine some alternative sources of information and visual imagery.

HPD-3474
Social Problems in Contemporary Society: Peace, War, Terrorism and Personal Freedom
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course is devoted to examining and interpreting the nature and justification, if any, for war and terrorism; moral questions about tactics in war and responding to terrorism; ideas for avoiding war and eliminating terrorism; and concepts and strategies for attaining peace and the morality of relations among nations. Following the theoretical, the course will focus on the historical details of the Vietnam and Iraq wars in the hope of uncovering some historical insights relevant to these issues. Finally, we will discuss the impact of terrorism and war upon such important values as personal freedom and patriotism. Readings will include the works of such thinkers and social activists as Michael Walzer; Stanley Karnow; Mohandas Gandhi; Martin Luther King, Jr.; George Orwell and Virginia Held.

HPD-3494
Workers of the World: The Representation of Labor
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Time is money. At least that’s what we’re told. It’s strange to imagine that you could put a price on hours and minutes, but this is precisely what we do at the workplace. This course will explore literary and visual texts that challenge our assumptions about how human time and human lives should be valued. Readings from authors of philosophical and fictional works will include Marx, Orwell, Sartre, Melville and Woolf. We will also view selected films in the science fiction and magic-realist genres that imagine futuristic forms of labor, such as Brazil, Metropolis and Dark City.

Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology

HPD-3511
Archaeology of New York City
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The past surrounds us in New York City. It’s under our feet and our basements, and enshrined in our museums. This course is an introduction to archaeology as a social science, as well as an examination of New York’s history using the artifacts found during archaeological excavations in the City. Museum visits and a walking tour of lower Manhattan are included.

HPD-3520
Men and Women in the Modern Workplace
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
After a historical overview of work in pre-industrial and industrial contexts, this course will focus on the experience of work in postindustrial society. Current issues within the workplace will be addressed, including: gender roles, the impact of the computer, functioning in complex organizations and opportunities for worker satisfaction. Those working in nonbureaucratic, smaller-scale contexts, such as professionals and artists, will also be discussed. A common theme will be the potential for, and limits to, worker autonomy and participation in decision-making. Readings will be supplemented with selected videos and films.

HPD-3522
Anthropology and the Bible
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits

This course will explore the Old and New Testaments through a study of cultural anthropology. Attention will be paid to the historical and cultural framework of Biblical times, with discussions focusing on social customs as well as religious, political and economic institutions. We will also examine our perceptions of contemporary cultural diversity and the factors that shape our culture.

HPD-3530
Interpersonal Behavior
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits

This course will analyze the structures and processes involved in face-to-face interpersonal relationships. A variety of social and psychological perspectives will form the basis for an analysis of love relationships, friendships, social and political interactions, workplace dynamics and family ties. Issues such as aggression, alienation, conformity and prejudice will also be addressed.

HPD-3531
Life Span Development: Child
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
In this course, we will focus on the extraordinary changes undergone by the developing child from conception through adolescence. We will base our study on the body of knowledge generated by theory and research in the field of developmental psychology. Our emphasis will be on patterns of physical maturation; linguistic and cognitive development; personal, social and emotional growth. Current issues in child psychology such as the working mother, popular media, neglect and abuse, drugs, and violence will also be addressed. The primary text will be Of Children: An Introduction to Child Development.

HPD-3532
Life Span Development: Adult
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Do adults develop through predictable stages or do they reach a peak in their twenties or thirties and then decline and die? Within the framework of this organizing question, we will trace predictable changes and challenges experienced by adults from young adulthood through old age and death. Central issues will include: finding a mate, bearing and rearing children, negotiating relationships with family and friends, selecting and developing a career, accommodating to changing physical capacities and health, and coming to terms with death.

HPD-3541
Introduction to Psychology
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Psychology is the science that systematically studies human behavior and experience. Within the last 100 years, psychologists have developed a significant body of knowledge in the areas of child and adult development, psychopathology, perception, cognition, memory, learning and social psychology. This course presents an overview of key topics in psychology and examines the methods that distinguish psychology from other approaches to human behavior.

HPD-3557
Income Inequality, Human Suffering and the Artist’s Perspective
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Why are the wealthy getting wealthier and the middle class and poor suffering? Does government policy contribute to inequality, and why do so many Americans seem to support policies that undermine the economic mobility, stability and growth of the middle class? What are the implications of the growing gap between the wealthy and the rest of society? This course will address the dangers posed by the concentration of wealth and power in the hands of a select few to a nation predicated on life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Racial and gender inequality as well as the attack on basic benefits, such as health insurance, unemployment insurance and public education will be explored in light of both capitalism and income inequality. Occupy Wall Street, Citizens United, the Tea Party, corporate interests, and other social and political movements will be discussed. Students will use their perspectives as artists to explore this threat to American stability and growth.

HPD-3601
The Role of Free Speech, Organized Activism and Public Opinion in American Democracy
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Have the traditional American ideals of free speech and democracy been reduced to mere rhetoric? Or do they remain a vital reality? Who really shapes U.S. public opinion? How is it formed? What role does it play in American political life? Why is the true nature of political power and policy shrouded in mystery? In this course, we will examine various theories of political and economic power as we explore the secret dynamics of American politics and public policy. The role of propaganda, activism and public opinion in current political life will be discussed in light of such issues as the presidential election, abortion, the environment, race relations and foreign policy. Assigned readings will be supplemented by salient videos and guest speakers.

HPD-3623
Art and the Psyche
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
What do you reveal to your audience through your work? Is your art a free flowing stream to your unconscious? Is it a window to your own internal world or a reflection of the external? Do you strive for the content or the form? Freud argued that when making art one engages in complex mental processes. He described art as an effort at mastery as well as a regressive search for pleasure, representing both affective and cognitive expression. This course will examine three distinct theories of psychology as they apply to the relationships between art, artist and audience. The lectures will focus on drive theory, ego psychology and object-relations theory and their corresponding approaches to art analysis. We will explore selected works from Sigmund Freud, Melanie Klein, Ernst Kris, D.W. Winnicott, Margaret Mahler, Anna Freud and Fred Pine, along with the principal authors of some alternative theories of psychology.

HPD-3636
Protect Your Creative Assets: Legal Concerns for Visual Artists in a Digital Age
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
You have a talent—a creative ability that others desire, need and covet. A foundation for a successful career is an understanding of your legal rights and responsibilities. This course will focus on the pressing concerns for artists today, including digital media, websites and blogs. It is critical to understand the bundle of rights you have so you can protect them. Learn how much content you can appropriate without being sued and losing your precious assets. During the course of your career, contracts will be presented to you as “standard” that can strip your rights away. Learn how to negotiate contracts and include provisions that are beneficial to you. In this course, you will become familiar with legal and business issues so that you can successfully navigate them throughout your career.

HPD-3641
Abnormal Psychology I: Neurotic and Character Disorders
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will introduce students to the psychological and interpersonal conflicts that underlie obsessional, hysterical, depressive and narcissistic disorders. Treatment strategies will also be explored with reference to actual case histories. Readings include selections from such clinical theorists as Sigmund Freud, Anna Freud, David Shapiro, Alice Miller, Charles Brenner, Karen Horney and Heinz Kohut.

HPD-3642
Abnormal Psychology II: Psychotic and Character Disorders
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will focus on the psychological and interpersonal conflicts that characterize schizoid and borderline personality disorders as well as psychotic mood disorders and schizophrenia. Treatment strategies will also be explored with reference to actual case studies. Readings include selections from such clinical theorists as Frieda Fromm-Reichmann, Harry Stack Sullivan, Irvin Yalom, W.W. Meissner, R.D. Laing and Peter Breggin.

HPD-3644
Deviant Behavior and Social Control
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will examine the causes and consequences of various forms of deviant behavior. In addition to viewing deviant behavior as a residual and problematic phenomenon in society, we will focus on what some sociologists consider to be the integrated and necessary relationship between deviance and society. Specific topics for analysis and discussion will include prostitution, pornography, drug addiction, alcoholism, mental illness, street crime and white-collar crime.

HPD-3652
Erich Fromm: From Love to Genocide
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Erich Fromm occupies an extremely important role in the history of the social sciences. His theories and ideas make him arguably the most influential theoretician of the modern era. Yet, he is simultaneously, and shockingly, one of the most underappreciated and overlooked. Drawing from multiple fields and disciplines beyond psychology, including anthropology, sociology, economics and religion, Fromm developed a body of work that rivals that of Freud and others. Fromm’s work may hold particular relevance for modern American culture, as he addresses the psychological impacts of freedom, wealth and human efforts to cope with the demands of life by resorting to reducing our inherent human worth to that of a commodity, and sacrificing true expressions of love and freedom for blind allegiance to dogma and groups. Readings will include Escape From Freedom, Man for Himself: An Inquiry Into the Psychology of Ethics, The Art of Loving, The Sane Society, To Have or To Be? and The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness. Fromm’s ideas and theories will also be compared to his contemporaries, including Freud, Horney, Marx and Niebuhr. The course will also look at his critiques of Freud and, correspondingly, critical analyses of his works (from Chomsky and others).

HPD-3677
Surviving into the 21st Century: A Multicultural Perspective
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
At this moment, there are approximately 40 wars on our small planet. Most are based on racial, religious or ethnic differences. With today’s weapons, it is easy to imagine omnicide, the death of everything. To move with hope in the 21st century, and the new millennium it has begun, we must learn to understand how we create “us” and “them” scenarios. We must learn to recognize ourselves as a single species. We will read some of the great writers and thinkers of many different cultures, religions and eras (Freud, Geronimo, Gandhi, Maya Angelou, Bei Dao, Neruda, Whitman, Marina Tvetayeva, Elie Wiesel, Nelson Mandela, Virginia Woolf, Malcolm X). The process of reading, writing and discussion should enable each student to raise his or her consciousness and to explore ways of eliminating prejudice in daily life, the necessary first step toward world peace.

HPD-3898
Theories of Personality I
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
What is a personality? How can we understand human behavior? What are the criteria according to which people can be characterized? This course will introduce students to a psychological approach to the question of what it means to be a person. It has two aims: First, it will provide an introduction to the classical personality theories of Freud, Jung, Erikson and Winnicott, as well as to current developmental perspectives on personality emerging from the ideas of Bowlby, Stern and Ainsworth; second, it will teach students to use theories of personality to inform their understanding of self and others.

HPD-3899
Theories of Personality II
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Beginning with classical psychoanalytic writers, such as Freud, Klein, Winnicott and Mahler, this course will review different theories of personality development. Contemporary relational theorists will also be studied, with an emphasis on gender development, creativity and the impact of childhood trauma on adult functioning.

HPD-4057
Modern Art and Psychology: The Secrets of the Soul
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
What do dreams mean? What causes madness? How should society care for the insane? Is the mind a machine? With the rise of science in modern times, psychologists have become the new doctors of the soul who address these age-old questions. This course presents their fascinating answers, as well as examines the influence of psychology on culture and the visual arts. Topics include: 19th-century asylum medicine, 20th-century psychoanalysis and today’s neuroscience, as well as metaphors for the psyche in the arts. Readings from: Madness in America: Cultural and Medical Perspectives on Mental Illness until 1914 and Dreams 1900-2000: Science, Art and the Unconscious Mind.

HPD-4282
The 21st-Century Family: Alternative Lifestyles, Civil Unions, Gay Marriage
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This behavioral science course will focus on an examination of the basic functions of the family unit as well as its cross-cultural and historical forms. The course will focus on the profound changes occurring within the 21st century family unit and the reasons for these changes. Emphasis will be placed on the new American family: civil unions, gay marriage, domestic partnerships, single parent families, step-families and blended families as well as other familial units. Issues will include a discussion of the political and economic impact of the new family paradigm upon society, alternative lifestyles, family values agenda, the divorce culture and abortion. This course gives students an understanding of the history of the family unit and how these institutions have changed over the past 25 years. Students will also explore how media and cultural institutions shaped the notion of marriage and family during the past half-century and the beginning of the 21st century.

HPD-4299
Race and Ethnic Relations
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will focus on a variety of theoretical and empirical issues related to race and ethnic relations. Topics will include the concept of “race”; minorities; social stratification and social conflict; the relationship between prejudice and discrimination; assimilation, amalgamation and cultural pluralism; race, ethnicity and ideology; patterns of segregation; and the question of racial oppression or class subordination.

HPD-4333
Man the Animal
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course in physical anthropology will cover human evolution, physical characteristics of human populations (including growth studies, human variation and forensic anthropology) and the other primates (monkeys and apes). There will be field trips to museums as well as the Bronx Zoo.

HPD-4481
Psychological Aspects of the Creative Process
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course reviews the intellectual and the emotional processes that facilitate creativity. What kind of thinking facilitates creativity and what blocks it, and how do you develop creative thinking? What kind of internalized negative voices block you from achieving your fullest creative potential? How do you carve a personal space that will best assist your art-making? We will read psychological theories as well as personal accounts of writers and artists who write about the creative process. The work of Julia Cameron, author of The Artist’s Way, will be the centerpiece of the course.

Science and Mathematics

HSD-2114
Evolution
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore the origins of life on Earth as well as the evolutionary processes of microbes, plants and animals, especially humans. Focal topics will include Darwin’s theory of natural selection and Gregor Mendel’s contributions to our understanding of the diversity of life forms. Modern tools of artificial selection and the cloning of organisms will also be examined and discussed. Students will further explore these topics with microscopes and other experiments in artificial selection.

HSD-2447
Cells and Molecules
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The last three decades have witnessed an enormous explosion of knowledge in cell biology. New techniques from molecular biology and new imaging techniques have revealed a complex web of interlocking processes, coordinated by a system or molecular signals. In this course, we will examine this system from a modern viewpoint, including the potential applications in cancer treatment and other clinical areas. Topics will include: basic biochemistry and cell anatomy; enzymes and metabolic pathways, signals and receptors; signal transduction cascades; the cell as a complex system with many subsystems; the cell cycle—control of reproduction and mortality, apoptosis, developmental biology, cancer and the aging process.

HSD-2566
Biological Genetics
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Genetics has increasingly found applications in a variety of areas collectively known as biotechnology. This course will focus on providing a basic understanding of genetics and biotechnology as they relate both to biological theories and to practical applications of other sciences. Applications to be discussed will include the methods of disease diagnosis, development of new drugs and vaccines, forensic sciences, agricultural sciences and uses in ecological sciences. Students will further explore these ideas with microscopes and experiments.

HSD-2572
Biological Chemistry and Art
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will study biology through hands-on explorations of materials that are vital to life and art. An examination of artistic materials such as pigments, plastics and oils will help to reveal the distinction between mineral and organic carbon-based substances. Our initial explorations of the minerals and the methodology used to analyze them will pave the way to an in-depth exploration of the more complex organic world. Microscopic studies of both cells and chemical reactions of living and dead specimens will be included. The course is supplemented with sessions at the American Museum of Natural History.

HSD-2578
Germs and Gems
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore the pigments and minerals that emerge from microbial worlds. The origins of life and production of pigments throughout the history of the Earth will be viewed through the “lens” of microscopic life. Bacteria, protists and exceptional viruses will be among the creatures discussed; they provided the first green revolution. These creatures reside in and on all life as seen by the symbiotic theories. Cell theory, germ theory, the chemistry of metals and pigments, and the laws that explain their colors will be discussed. These topics will be further examined with microscopes and other experiments with minerals and germs.

HSD-2631
Neuroscience and Culture
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will analyze the essential connections between neuroscience and culture in contemporary society and in history. We will explore general concepts about the nervous system from a variety of perspectives—structural, physiological, behavioral—and examine their resonance in today’s world. Attention will be given to cultural products that address these topics, such as literature, music, film and, especially, the visual arts.

HSD-2642
Designs of Brains and Minds
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Diverse roles of the brain in the biological world and the emergence of artificial intelligence will be explored in this course. Topics will include: evolution and development of the brain, engineering intelligence in animals, artificial organs, robotics and neural networks as the basis of artificial minds. Explorations of these topics will be supplemented with views through microscopes and by conducting other experiments into the theories of the brain.

HSD-2663
Metaphors in Science and Their Relation to Culture
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The role and significance of metaphor in cognition, particularly with respect to science and art, will be analyzed in this course. As we investigate the nature and ramifications of metaphorical thinking in scientific theory and practice, we will attempt to understand the primary cultural factors that affect this mode of thought. The influence of media on science, culture and especially the visual arts will also be explored.

HSD-2666
Our Living Planet: The Biology of Life on Earth
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore the biological nature and environmental habitats of microbial, plant and animal life on earth. The origins, physiology, behavior and reproductive patterns of the planet’s various life forms will be examined in relation to their diverse natural conditions and interactions. The quest for life on other planets will also be discussed. The course will also explore this world with microscopes and cultures of a few of its creatures.

HSD-2773
Life in the Concrete Jungle: Urban Ecology
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
New York is one of the largest cities in the world, with numerous ecosystem habitats and thousands of species in its backyard. In this field and laboratory course, students will be introduced to the conceptual framework of ecology, major environmental and local ecological issues, strategies and skills needed for scientific study, and trans-disciplinary art and ecological practices. Urban ecology is broadly defined as the study of relationships between living organisms and their biotic and abiotic (non-living) environment within cities. Field trips will explore local aquatic and terrestrial habitats as well as urban tolerant and migratory floral/faunal species. Discussions will address the importance of ecology in improving environmental quality and for conserving biodiversity. Laboratory exercises will explore population impact, environmental stressors, ecological footprint, urban biodiversity, and others. Students will complete written responses to varied environmental science subjects, pursue field studies and conceptualize their ideas for making New York City more sustainable. This course will increase each student’s understanding of ecosystems and fundamental ideas of environmental science.

HSD-2774
Life in the Concrete Jungle: Urban Zoology
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Urban zoology is the study of non-human fauna in cities. In this field and laboratory course, students will be introduced to the fundamental concepts for the study of animal life. Subjects will include: physical and chemical structures of life, physiology and development, evolution and taxonomy, extinction and conservation of animal biodiversity. Subjects will be contextualized through the examination of urban animal populations. Field trips to local ecosystems will explore migratory birds, butterflies and fishes, as well as resident populations of urban mammals and herptiles. Students will complete written responses to subjects covered in class and on field trips, and perform dissections and micro-fauna laboratory manipulations. This course will increase each student’s understanding of local faunal populations and the fundamental ideas underlying the scientific study of the animal kingdom.

HSD-2862
The Science of Bugs: An Introduction to Arthropodology
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Arthropodology is the branch of science that deals with the study of arthropods such as arachnids, crustaceans and insects. From tiny water fleas to enormous ancient trilobites to new adaptions of pesticide-tolerant NYC cockroaches, such arthropods are the most diverse and abundant animals in this planet’s history. In this introductory-level course, students will learn about arthropod evolution, classification, physiology and diversity. This is a dual laboratory and field course, with trips to local NYC urban ecosystems to study insect and aquatic crustacean populations. Students will participate in the collection of data on local arthropod populations, including the analysis of terrestrial species using traps. In addition, a field trip to the American Museum of Natural History will examine the evolutionary origins (the Cambrian explosion) of modern arthropod species. Laboratory exercises will include the culturing of fruit flies and examination of developmental stages. This course will increase each student’s understanding of the scientific study of modern “bugs,” their evolution and groupings, as well as their ecological significance. Required text: Insects of New England & New York.

HSD-2863
The Biology of Feathered Dinosaurs: An Introduction to Bird Evolution and Natural History
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This introductory ornithology course will examine principles of avian biology, which include subjects such as evolution, taxonomy (classification), life cycles and conservation. It will be an integrated lecture and laboratory course, with several field trips to local urban ecosystems to study bird populations. Students will be trained as citizen scientists and participate in gathering data on migratory birds passing through New York City as part of a nationwide Audubon program. In addition, a field trip to the American Museum of Natural History will examine the evolutionary origins of modern avian species. Laboratory exercises include the examination of bird cellular material (from bones and feathers) and other analytical techniques. Students will complete reading assignments, generate several written responses to varied lab and field exercises, participate in discussions and maintain a weekly journal of bird observations. Required Text: Peterson Field Guide to Birds of North America (first edition).

HSD-2898
Cold-Blooded: An Introduction to Ichthyology and Herpetology
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Fishes, amphibians and reptiles are among the oldest ectothermic vertebrates on the planet. From Whale sharks to Komodo dragons to Microhylidae frogs the size of your fingernail—such cold-blooded animals are evolutionarily diverse and geographically. This course is an introduction to the fields of ichthyology and herpetology, and students will learn about the classification, natural history, physiology and conservation of the world’s species of fish, frogs, toads, salamanders, newts, gymnophiona, snakes, lizards, amphisbaenids, turtles, terrapins, tortoises, crocodilians and the tuataras. This will be an integrated lecture and laboratory course, with several field trips to local urban ecosystems to study fish, frogs and turtle populations. A field trip to the American Museum of Natural History will examine the evolutionary origins of ancient groups. Laboratory exercises will include dissections, phylogenic categorization from preserved specimens, and other analytical techniques.

HSD-2987
Introduction to Mathematics
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course approaches mathematics historically, emphasizing its relation to art, science and other cultural areas. We will study ancient Greek mathematics and early astronomers; number systems and geometry; algebra, projective geometry, early physics and Renaissance culture.

HSD-3003
Energy and the Modern World
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will examine the basic nature, forms and concepts of energy. Special attention will be paid to the importance of energy conservation and production of energy in today’s world. These ideas will be supplemented by laboratory analyses of various types of physical, chemical and biological energy as well as the methods by which they can be converted into one another.

HSD-3016
Science in the Modern World
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The triumphs of modern science have been heralded as an emancipation from the burdens of ignorance, fear, toil and disease. But have the sciences fulfilled their promise to liberate humankind? Have we truly overcome superstition and dogma, or simply replaced them with the uncertainties of a scientific “metaphysics” bristling with mysterious forces, powers, fields, waves, quarks and rays? Have we achieved the goals of knowledge and power, or have we reinvented ignorance and multiplied the dangers that surround us? In an attempt to come to grips with these questions, this course takes stock of recent scientific progress in fields such as anthropology, cosmology, ecology, subatomic physics and genetic engineering, measuring the claims of science and technology against those of the individual. Microscopes and other experiments will be used to provide students with more direct experience with these ideas.

HSD-3021
Technology, Identity and Crisis
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Technological innovation has been a major driver of fundamental cultural and socio-economic developments in society. This course will examine the development of crucial technologies affecting modern civilization from the Industrial Revolution to the present. Major topics covered will include transportation, communications, electrification and materials. We will also examine the role of modern technology in shaping who we are as individuals and as member of society. Of course, this all comes at a cost since That-Which-Makes-Us-Who-We-Are has massive consequences, often on a global scale. Our last goal is to consider the consequences of our technological lives for the environment, social stability and long-term economic growth. Readings will include an array of modern studies on various technologies and their impacts.

HSD-3044
History of the Human Body: Society, Culture and Medicine
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will survey theories of the body, the history of anatomy, the diagnosis and treatment of disease, pharmacology and the emergence of modern scientific medicine. We will also consider the social and cultural aspects of medicine, focusing on the larger beliefs and attitudes of the people who used and generated medical knowledge. Moreover, we will investigate the impact medical thought has had on aspects of modern culture. Our sources will include contemporary artifacts, both material and literary, as well as recent historical studies.

HSD-3111
Astronomy
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This is an introductory astronomy course for nonscience students. We will begin with a study of the early history of astronomy and our current understanding of the planets and other components of the solar system. The second part of the course is devoted to the study of the rest of the universe. We examine the optical tools used, spectral types, the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, the various kinds of stars and their life histories, black holes, galaxies, quasars and other celestial bodies. Cosmological theories will be discussed.

HSD-3114
Modern Art and Astronomy: The Expanding Universe
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Where do stars come from? How big is the universe? What’s inside an atom? Why is the sky blue? In the last century, scientists have given revolutionary answers to these questions, profoundly altering how modern society perceives reality. This course presents fascinating responses to these questions in plain, easy-to-understand English, along with illustrations of their impact on art and culture. Topics include Einstein’s theory of the relativity of space and time, the discovery that the universe is expanding, space travel, the splitting of the atom, and the dawning of the nuclear age, as well as scientific metaphors in the arts.

HSD-3204
Science, Technology and War
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The relationship between war, technology and science from the Renaissance to the modern day will be examined in this course. We will consider topics as important as the introduction of gunpowder, the role of industry, the frightful technologies of the 20th century, and the emergence of networked command and control. A secondary focus in this course will consider the characteristics of the societies that have made military innovation possible since a profound change in one often produces a profound change in the other. We will also address how the technologies of the modern era have fundamentally changed the nature of warfare. Moreover, we will examine the response of enemy combatants to overwhelming technological force and consider how modern conflicts evolve as a result. Readings will involve key contemporary sources as well as recent works of scholarship.

HSD-3211
The Material World
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
In this course, we will examine the way scientists and engineers look at the material world around us. At a practical level, we first examine the basic mechanical principles used in the design of cathedrals, ships and living organisms. At a more fundamental level, we ask: What do physicists know about the ultimate nature of matter? What are the ultimate laws governing the physical universe? We examine the answer to this question as it has evolved from the time of Newton to the present.

HSD-3253
Modern Art and Biology: The Mystery of Life
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
How did the first life on earth begin? How smart were dinosaurs? Why do children look like their parents? How does the human brain remember things? Scientists gave revolutionary answers to these questions in the 20th century, profoundly altering how modern society perceived reality. This course presents fascinating responses to these questions in plain English, along with illustrations of their impact on art and culture. Topics include the theory of evolution, how cells function, deciphering the DNA molecule, and medical revolutions from antibiotics to organ transplants as well as biological metaphors in the arts.

HSD-3254
Science and Religion
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Science and religion are two of the most important forces in modern civilization, shaping both the modes of life and the worldviews of many. This course will examine the historical relations between them from the Scientific Revolution to the modern day. The focus will be on developments in Western culture, and examples from other cultures and religious traditions will be included. We will consider how science and religion have sometimes worked together to provide an understanding of the natural world, and the ways in which they have been in conflict. Some of the controversies that we will examine include Galileo’s trial, the emergence of Darwin’s Theory of Evolution and its consequences, and modern debates on the teaching of evolution and other areas of science in education. A second goal of the course will be to examine the main differences between modern science and religion in terms of both philosophy and culture. Readings will include primary sources as well as recent works of scholarship.

HSD-3322
Environmental Studies
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course stresses the basic principles of the physical sciences. Topics include: physical and chemical parameters of the environment, populations, biochemical cycles, biological diversity, human ecology and energy.

HSD-3523
Conservation Biology
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Conservation biology is the study of the maintenance, loss and restoration of ecosystems of biodiversity. This course covers the basics of paleontology, evolution and ecology, as well as relevant issues in environmental science. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the issues involved in our current extinction crisis and to enable them to make informed decisions on both national and local levels. Special attention will be paid to current debate and controversy in this quickly growing field of study. There will also be a field trip to the American Museum of Natural History, where the students will visit a working conservation genetics laboratory. Readings include: Fundamentals of Conservation Biology by Malcolm L. Hunter and The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert, as well as excerpts from Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food by Paul Greenburg and A Sand County Almanac by Aldo Leopold.

HSD-3901
Human Diseases
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will survey the major human diseases, their history, causes and treatment. Emerging diseases are also discussed. The legends and myths about diseases will be clarified and insights into infectious diseases will be provided. A trip to the American Museum of Natural History will be included.

HSD-4026
Art, Science and the Spiritual
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
What is our place in the universe? How do we perceive the world? Students will learn how modern science has profoundly transformed modern art. The theories of Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein forever changed how artists understand reality. The rise of science also entailed the decline of organized religion, causing traditional spiritual questions to be reformulated in secular terms. At the same time, the theories proposed by psychologists—the new doctors of the soul—revolutionized modern society’s understanding of the human psyche. Artists responded to the challenges posed by science and psychology by creating new metaphors for the human condition during the first secular, scientific age in human history. We will explore the interplay between art, science and the spiritual by evaluating major scientific and religious trends of the 20th century in relation to the representative artistic movements and works of the time.

HSD-4128
Paradigm Shift: Exploring the Links Between Lab, Studio Art and Existential Experience
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
In this course, we will analyze the concept of paradigm shift. As our class focus and discussions move from lab experimentation, through studio art to life experience, we will explore important science paradigm shifts such as the discovery of neurons and the creation of the first transgenic mammals as well as important paradigmatic shifts in art and society. During the course of our studies, we will examine the connections between experience in the lab, the art studio, our personal lives and the world at large.

HSD-4129
Science, Art and Visual Culture
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will analyze the essential connections between science, art and visual culture. We will review and explore the importance of visual models in science and examine how these visual models are integrated into culture. The class will devote special attention to a variety of cultural products that address these topics such as books, music, film and especially the visual arts.

HSD-4138
Brave New Worlds: Science and Science Fiction
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore the complex relationship between science and science fiction, alternatively focusing on science fiction as a source of inspiration for scientists and, conversely, the role of science as a source of inspiration for science-fiction authors and filmmakers. Students will become familiar with the historical development and far-reaching consequences of scientific discoveries and advances in scientific theory. From neuroscience through genetic engineering and nanotechnology, our work will give us a deeper understanding of how scientific research and science fiction have contributed to the generation of new ideas, social relationships and worldviews. We will read and discuss a wide variety of scientific articles and science-fiction novels such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Aldus Huxley’s Brave New World and Italo Calvino’s Cosmicomics. Films such as Fantastic Voyage, Blade Runner and The Matrix will be screened. Students will be encouraged to create their own science-based artistic projects.

HSD-4204
Human Anatomy and Physiology
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
A comparative study of human anatomy in the context of vertebrate evolution is the focus of this course. Students will view tissues and cells through microscopes and with other physiological experiments. Field trips to the American Museum of Natural History and detailed discussion of the major physiological systems will be included.

HSD-4232
Light, Color and Vision
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
The basic physics and chemistry of light in a nonmathematical treatment of classical geometrical and physical optics will be examined in this course. We will discuss: refraction and diffraction; structural color; a qualitative discussion of the modern view of the nature of light and its interactions with matter; photochemistry, pigments and dyes; the principles underlying fluorescence and phosphorescence, lasers and holography.

HSD-4233
Vision, Perception and the Mind
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore the biology and psychology of vision from the sensory responses to light in microorganisms and plants to the complex interplay of visual perception, thought and creativity in the human brain. Readings and discussions will be supplemented by laboratory experiments and analyses of various theories of vision and the brain.

HSD-4289
Art, Mathematics and the Mystical
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
What is infinity? Do numbers originate in our minds or in the cosmos? How do abstract patterns acquire meaning? These fascinating questions lie at the heart of mathematics, which—because of its abstractness—is the foundation of exact thought and the international language of today’s high-tech culture. But despite its pivotal importance, mathematics is often a disappointment to artists because its secrets are written in a language—mathematical symbols—that they may not understand. The goal of this course is to describe in plain English the ideas that drive mathematics—numbers, infinity, geometry, pattern, and so on—and to demonstrate how these topics have been absorbed, interpreted and expressed by modern artists. The course will also explain how mathematical ideas are conveyed in symbols, formulas, graphs and diagrams. These figures and formulas amount to a pictorial visualization of abstract concepts that have profound implications for artists who create animated patterns, abstract paintings or conceptual art. No background in mathematics is needed; the only prerequisite is a natural curiosity about numbers.

HSD-4324
Food Explorations
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
Cuisine, nutrition and the problems of our abundant food supply will be examined in this course. Topics will include the selections of crops, meats and beverages by ancient civilizations; industrialization of farming through genetic engineering, and fast-food diets. The impact of our changing taste for nutrition and our health will also be explored. Additional topics suggested by students will be addressed. Field trips to green markets and purveyors of food will provide a chance to explore the culinary arts.

HSD-4444
Frequencies of Sound
One semester: 3 humanities and sciences credits
This course will explore frequencies and wavelengths of sound. Laboratory activities include making sound from chemical reactions with the use of metals, salt and quartz crystals, and various types of carbon in graphite, organic molecules and their ions. This includes discussions about magnetism, voltages, calories, echoes, reflections, refraction and polarization by additional use of photo-resistors and photovoltaic cells. These ideas will be further used to discuss the sounds made by plants and animals as part of their daily and seasonal lives.

SPECIAL COURSES

SPD-2717
The Philosophy and Practice of Yoga I
One semester: 3 miscellaneous credits
Three routines designed for freedom and alignment of both the body and mental processes will be practiced. Gradual or sudden improvement in lifestyle involving diet, general health habits, ways of thinking, etc., will be studied and discussed. Texts include: B.K.S. Iyengar’s Light on Yoga; Dick Gregory’s Natural Diet for Folks Who Eat; P. Yoganand’s Autobiography of a Yogi.

SPD-2718
The Philosophy and Practice of Yoga II
One semester: 3 miscellaneous credits
Throughout the semester we will practice three different routines designed to develop a fund of energy and vitality. By balancing these energies by practice and meditation, we can reach higher and more efficient levels of mental/spiritual perception and calmness. Because yoga demands a holistic approach in lifestyles for best results, we will study literature dealing with diet and general health. Class discussions will share experiences and information. The following books will be used: The Soul and Its Mechanism, Alice Bailey; Diet for a Small Planet, Frances Lappe; Yoga, Immortality and Freedom, Mircea Eliade; Pranayama (The Yoga Breathing), Andre van Lysbeth.

SPD-2877
Holography
One semester: 3 miscellaneous credits
This studio-oriented course will begin with an introductory discussion of the basic principles and history of holography, followed by work in the holography lab. Students will make single-beam-reflection (Denisyuk) holograms, shadowgrams, laser-viewable transmission master holograms and white-light viewable transfers.

English as a Second Language Courses

ESD-0050
Reading Strategies
One semester: no credit
Students will develop their vocabulary and critical reading and thinking skills through discussion of essays, short stories and related media. Students will be required to keep a reading journal.

ESD-0060
Writing Strategies
One semester: no credit
This course will focus on the fundamentals of essay writing using class readings and discussions as a basis for writing. Grammar, sentence and paragraph logic, idea development, organization and essay structure will be explored.

ESD-0066
Topics in Grammar
One semester: no credit
In this course students will improve their grammar through an exploration of themes in American culture. It will focus on grammar topics that will emerge from paragraph writing exercises and class discussions. Different themes will be presented each semester.

ESD-0070-A
The Language of Art I: The New York Art Scene and You
One semester: no credit
Place yourself in the long line of New York-inspired artists! In this course, students will explore the New York art scene and prominent place in the art world within a historical context. We will view works by artists who created work locally, as well as New York as the subject matter in art. The vibrant arts of the Harlem Renaissance will be included, as well as post-World War II artworks as a pivotal time both historically and artistically, influencing some of the world’s most creative artists to work and exhibit here. We will consider how the success of abstract expressionism and pop art helped enhance New York’s status as an international center. Works of art will be viewed in class and during field trips to galleries, and students will build a substantial art vocabulary. Readings, writings and presentations will complement discussions on artists such as Jackson Pollock, Romare Bearden, Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Edward Hopper and Georgia O’Keeffe.

ESD-0070-B
The Language of Art: Lens-Based Art
One semester: no credit
This course will acquaint students with the history and ongoing influence of the vibrant artistic disciplines based on photography, cinematography, animation, video art, and their related forms. From the earliest experiments in chemical, analog photography, through the groundbreaking motion studies of Muybridge that led to the burgeoning of animation, the earliest ‘flicker’ movies, pioneers like Nam Jun Paik, and the digital revolution to the most inventive uses of high-tech, interactive imagery in current artists’ repertoires, we will trace the ways in which science has offered new possibilities to artists through readings, videos, and museum and studio visits. Students will develop fluency in discussing the range of lens-based media, create “virtual collaborations” with artists using their own visual and written language, and employ skills in hands-on project/presentations in class.

ESD-0071
The Language of Art II: The New York Art Scene in Global Perspective
One semester: no credit
Students will view the New York art scene within a global, historical framework. We will study the shift from Paris to New York as the center of the art world after 1945, and critically view works from the following styles that were created and/or exhibited in NYC: abstract expressionism, color field, conceptual art, site-specific, installation and minimalism. Artists to be discussed include Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Paul Klee, Joan Miró, Piet Mondrian, Wassily Kandinsky, Richard Serra, Christo, Ellsworth Kelly, Mark Rothko, Robert Motherwell, Helen Frankenthaler and David Smith. In addition to class discussions, field trips to galleries, presentations and written pieces, students will create a collaborative class journal. Students will use the culture, language and art they experience as the theme for a semester-long project incorporating words and text.

ESD-0073
TOEFL Strategies
One semester: no credit
Using the Internet-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL iBT), students will study test-taking strategies, listening comprehension, grammar, reading comprehension and vocabulary. Strategies and language topics will vary each semester.

ESD-0078
Speak Fluently
One semester: no credit
Students will build fluency through acting and improvisation techniques. These exercises will help students to feel at ease with public speaking and class discussion of significant topics. Themes will vary each semester.

ESD-0226

IBT TOEFL Reading

One semester: no credit

In this course, students will focus on the reading portion of the iBT TOEFL exam. Through practice in reading passages and in-class exams, students will learn strategies and vocabulary to foster the comprehension skills necessary for the iBT exam and academic material. Speed reading techniques will also be discussed. Home assignments will be given.

ESD-0283
Building Vocabulary Skills
One semester: no credit
This course will help you to increase your word power through themed readings and videos, dictionary use, and participation in engaging discussions, presentations and writing topics that elicit the natural use of words. You will study a wide variety of vocabulary words used in academic settings, and learn about word forms (noun, verb, adjective, adverb). A personal vocabulary journal will be required. Themes will vary each semester.

ESD-0288
Acting the Memoir
One semester: no credit
In this course, students will read published memoirs, write their own memoirs and enact them within the structure of the improvisational techniques of the famed acting technique, The Method. This multi-faceted learning experience will enrich each student’s communication and speaking skills. Readings will vary each semester.

ESD-0311
Improve Your Pronunciation
One semester: no credit
Using state-of-the-art pronunciation software, students will improve their English pronunciation through interactive exercises that focus on target speech sounds, as well as acting and improvisation techniques. Class presentation and discussion skills will also be included.

ESD-0323
Smartphone Documentary
One semester: no credit
Screenings of short documentaries that are followed by discussions will kick off this documentary-making course for multilingual students. Using their smartphone cameras, students will work individually and in groups to conceptualize, plan, shoot and present assigned short documentary videos. Collaborating in multilingual teams, participants will record interviews on prepared themes discussed in class to create video pieces that address topics of interest and personal video essays.

 

 

 

School of Visual Arts | 209 East 23 Street, NY, NY 10010-3994 | Tel: 212.592.2000 | Fax: 212.725.3587