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To earn a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Film & Video at SVA, students must complete 120 credits as follows:

  • 72 credits in studio art courses
  • 30 credits in humanities & sciences
  • 15 credits in art history courses
  • 3 elective credits from among the undergraduate offerings
First-Year Requirements

AHD-1070 Film History and Criticism
CFD-1020 Introduction to Production I
CFD-1025 Introduction to Production II
CFD-1070 Acting for Filmmakers
CVD-1080 Editing I
CVD-1085 Editing II
CFD-1140 Fundamentals of Narrative I
CFD-1145 Fundamentals of Narrative II
HCD-1020 Writing and Literature I
HCD-1025 Writing and Literature II

Second-Year Requirements

Cinematography
CFD-2010  Production Workshop I
CFD-2015  Production Workshop II
CFD-2070  Cinematography I
CFD-2075  Cinematography II
CFD-2080  Production Design

AHD-2068 The Language of Film
or AHD-2070    International Cinema  

Directing
CFD-2010  Production Workshop I
and CFD-2015  Production Workshop II
or CFD-2017     Documentary Workshop I
and CFD-2018     Documentary Workshop II  

CFD-2020  Editing: Adobe Premiere Pro
or CVD-2050     Editing: Introduction to Avid 

CFD-2050  Sound Production
CFD-2120  Writing and Directing I

CFD-2125  Writing and Directing II
or CFD-2131     Directing Actors 

AHD-2068 The Language of Film
or AHD-2070    International Cinema 

Editing
CFD-2010  Production Workshop I
CFD-2015  Production Workshop II

CFD-2020  Editing: Adobe Premiere Pro
or CVD-2050 Editing: Introduction to Avid 

CFD-3130  Pro Tools I

AHD-2068 The Language of Film
or AHD-2070    International Cinema 

Screenwriting
CFD-2140  Writing the Feature-Length Script I
CFD-2145  Writing the Feature-Length Script II
CFD-2170  Media and Society
CFD-2120  Writing and Directing I

CFD-2125  Writing and Directing II
or CFD-2350 Adaptation for the Short Film

CFD-2262     Creating Character (The Actor/Writer Collaboration)

AHD-2068 The Language of Film
or AHD-2070  International Cinema

Third-Year Requirements

Cinematography
CVD-3010  Advanced Production I
CVD-3015  Advanced Production II
CFD-3030  Advanced Lighting/Cinematography I
CFD-3035  Advanced Lighting/Cinematography II
AHD-3060 Masters of Light
HLD-3130  Film and Literature I
HLD-3135  Film and Literature II

Directing
CVD-3010  Advanced Production I
and CVD-3015 Advanced Production II

or CFD-3021 Producing/Directing Episodic Television I 
and CFD-3022     Producing/Directing Episodic Television II

or CFD-3326 Advanced Documentary Workshop I
and CFD-3327 Advanced Documentary Workshop II

CFD-3060  Advanced Writing and Directing I
CFD-3065  Advanced Writing and Directing II       
HLD-3130 Film and Literature I
HLD-3135  Film and Literature II

Editing
HLD-3130  Film and Literature I
HLD-3135  Film and Literature II
CFD-3180  Pro Tools II: Sound Design

CFD-3230  The Art of Editing
or CFD-3434  Postproduction: Structures in Storytelling 

CFD-3432  Postproduction: The Digital Workflow
CVD-3060  Editing: Avid II

Screenwriting
CFD-3060  Advanced Writing and Directing I
and CFD-3065  Advanced Writing and Directing II

or CFD-3170 Writing for Television I
and CFD-3175 Writing for Television II

CFD-3140  Advanced Feature Screenwriting I
CFD-3145  Advanced Feature Screenwriting II                   

or
AND-3251 Advanced Screenwriting for Animation 
and AND-3252 Advanced Screenwriting for Animation II 

HLD-3130  Film and Literature I
HLD-3135 Film and Literature II

CFD-3190  The Business and Craft of Writing for Television

Fourth-Year Requirements

Cinematography
CFD-4101  Master Class in Cinematography I
CFD-4102  Master Class in Cinematography II
CFD-4940  Film Thesis I
CFD-4945  Film Thesis II

Directing, Editing
CFD-4010  Career Strategies
CFD-4940  Film Thesis I
CFD-4945  Film Thesis II

Screenwriting
CFD-4040  Master Class in Screenwriting I
CFD-4045  Master Class in Screenwriting II
CFD-4950  Screenwriting Thesis I 
CFD-4955  Screenwriting Thesis II

 

Film & Video General Course Listing

First-Year Course Listing 

AHD-1070
Film History and Criticism
One semester: 3 art history credits
Through an interdisciplinary approach to contemporary theoretical discourses of cinema, the goal of this course is to familiarize students with the formal and stylistic features of film history and analysis. We will examine forms of interpretation and subjects of representation via the evolution of the cinema. Beginning with the Lumière brothers, Georges Méliès and the early works of D. W. Griffith, we will trace the historical development of film with an exploration of genres that include American silent comedies, German expressionism, surrealism and Soviet formalism. Classical Hollywood films and the establishment of the studio system will also be examined. The final segment of the course will be devoted to an analysis of postwar European masters such as Rossellini, Truffaut, Godard, Bergman, Fellini and Antonioni.

CFD-1020 / CFD-1025
Introduction to Production I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

Designed as an introduction to the art of filmmaking, these courses will examine film language and visual storytelling, including structure, psychology of the frame, storyboarding, lensing, work flow, scene coverage and lighting. The importance of collaboration will be emphasized by working on different scenes in production teams and with professional actors. The spring semester will continue to explore in-class productions working with actors in a professional environment, with an emphasis on the actor-director relationship. Crew management will be addressed through in-class scene work. Each student will prepare a storyboard and shot list, as well as cast and budget a short digital or film project. 

CFD-1070
Acting for Filmmakers
One semester: 3 studio credits
This course is designed as an introduction to the craft of acting. Built on the basis of moment-to-moment reality, sense memory, improvisation and intuitive use of the self, students will learn how to create believable characters for the screen. The vocabulary necessary for communicating with actors will be taught as well as the art of constructive criticism essential to directing films. 

CVD-1080 / CVD-1085
Editing I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

The grammar and aesthetics of editing in the visual storytelling process is the focus of these courses. We will examine the theory and process of editing through lectures, screenings, assignments and exercises. Areas of exploration will include editorial and narrative structure, rhythm and pace. Scene study and editing choices that maximize the actors’ performances will be emphasized. In the spring semester students will continue to refine their skills as editors. Short films and scenes will be analyzed for their structure and meaning, and students will continue to hone their skills with the editing process through demonstration and assignments. 

CFD-1140 / CFD-1145
Fundamentals of Narrative I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

Gaining the necessary skills for writing well-structured scripts will be the focus of these courses. Geared to short screenplays that students can use in their production classes, assignments will emphasize the fundamentals of visual language, in-depth character development and narrative structure. We will explore the dramatic choices involved in fiction, nonfiction, and adapted narratives as ways of expressing their individual voices. The spring semester will explore more advanced forms of storytelling for the screen. While assignments will include diverse forms, such as genre, documentary and webisodes, the focus is on the construction and sequencing of scenes within the context of the character-driven narrative.

HCD-1020 / HCD-1025

Writing and Literature I and II
Two semesters: 3 humanities and sciences credits per semester
The first part of this two-semester offering will help students become capable, critical and independent writers. With its focus on developing an argument, the course offers an introduction to some of the skills necessary for critical analysis of written art. It will include a review of writing basics (grammar, coherence, idea development, sentence and essay structure). Since reading widely is a foundation of good writing, course readings are drawn from a selection of premodern Western works, including drama, poetry, the narrative and the critical essay, which will be used as discussion and writing prompts. The second semester will emphasize essay development, reading and critical thinking. Students will write essays and a research paper, and continue to work on their grammar and essay development. Readings are drawn from a selection of modern works, including drama, poetry, the narrative and the critical essay.

Upper-Level Courses 

Film and video majors may register for courses in the BFA Computer Art, Computer Animation and Visual Effects Department with the proper prerequisites and permission from both department chairs. Students will not be charged any course fee associated with these classes. 

CFD-2010 / CFD-2015
Production Workshop I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

Using 16mm and digital cameras, these courses will build on the techniques introduced in the foundation year to explore more complex projects. Special lenses, stocks, filters, lights, as well as support equipment will be introduced through technical demonstrations, lectures and assignments. Working in production teams, students will explore various filmmaking aspects and approaches. In the second semester, students must complete a film and work on individual projects. 

CFD-2017 / CFD-2018
Documentary Workshop I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

These courses will combine the theory and practice of creating a documentary. Students will research, write, plan and execute a video documentary on a subject of their choice. Screenings of work from such documentary filmmakers as D.A. Pennebaker, the Maysles, Barbara Kopple and Errol Morris will be included. Editing theories and techniques for the documentary film will be discussed. 

CFD-2020
Editing: Adobe Premiere Pro
One semester: 3 studio credits
Through overall projects and postproduction collaboration, the theory and practice of editing will be the focus of this course. Working with Adobe Premiere Pro, students will explore storytelling, conveying emotion and pacing. Screenings, in-class exercises and individual projects will be integral parts of this course. 

CFD-2050
Sound Production
One semester: 3 studio credits
This comprehensive course analyzes the role of sound techniques in film and video—music, effects, voice-overs and sync sound, among other components. Instruction in the composing of sound for film will be given and students will compose sound for theoretical situations. Readings that cover the principles of sound theory and application will be assigned. Visiting specialists will give practical instruction with recording machines, microphones and all mechanical elements used by sound recordists. 

CVD-2050
Editing: Introduction to Avid
One semester: 3 studio credits
Working with the Avid Media Composers, this course will examine the concepts and principles of random-accessed digital editing. We will discuss various ways of editorial problem solving for postproduction projects that range from documentary to commercial spots, industrials and music videos. Projects will be digitized and edited to a final master. 

AHD-2068
The Language of Film
One semester: 3 art history credits
Serving as an introduction to the basic terms and concepts of cinematic language, this course will explore the vocabulary, grammar, sign and syntax of film through screenings, lectures and discussion. Feature-length narratives as well as animated, experimental and documentary shorts will be addressed, with an emphasis on examining the function of the film as a formal construct—the basic principles of film form. We will also pay particular attention to the techniques of the film medium along with the questions of types and genres of films. The course is analytical but with a thoroughly pragmatic bent: to map the extraordinary diversity of contemporary cinematic practice in relation to editing, sound, cinematography, framing, genre, auteur and narration. 

AHD-2070
International Cinema
One semester: 3 art history credits
Designed to facilitate an understanding of classic and contemporary international cinema, this course is dedicated to the study of films that have adopted a different aesthetic framework from Hollywood. We will discuss themes, ideologies, forms, the impact of history—both political and social—and the background stories of the filmmakers. Screenings will be drawn from the cinema of Mira Nair (India), Jean-Luc Godard (France), Andrei Tarkovsky (Russia), Federico Fellini (Italy) Carl Dreyer (Denmark), Luis Buñuel (Spain/Mexico) and Peter Weir (Australia), among others. 

CFD-2070 / CFD-2075
Cinematography I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester
The technical and aesthetic aspect of lighting for film and digital video will be explored in these courses. We will begin with an examination of basic lighting instruments and their use in the art of lighting: composition, color, light-and-shadow, three-point lighting, cameras and lenses. We will then focus on creating and controlling the cinematic style, and studying the differences between film and digital video. Exposure, latitude, interior, exterior, shooting, high-key and low-key styles, narrative and commercial production will all be covered. The spring semester will concentrate on lens, film stock, and digital video compression. Assignments will vary from 30-second commercials to tabletop and blue-screen productions to recreating scenes from feature films. The close relationship of production and postproduction in a computerized world will be addressed. 

CFD-2080
Production Design
One semester: 3 studio credits
Understand the role of production design in the filmmaking process will be explored in this course. It will begin by tracing the history of art direction in the Hollywood studio system through the work of leading art directors. Particular attention will be given to William Cameron Menzies and how his contributions led to the advent of the production designer. The craft, process and working methods of the production designer will be explored in detail. How directors collaborate with designers to capture their vision on film will also be examined. 

CFD-2088
Makeup for Film and Television
One semester: 3 studio credits
Beginning with an overview of makeup design and application (painting, construction methods and prosthesis), this course will then focus on exploration and experimentation of various materials used in the field of makeup for broadcast media. Students will design and create their own full ‘character’ makeup, which may be used for their film and animation projects. 

CFD-2120
Writing and Directing I
One semester: 3 studio credits
A collaborative fusion of writing and directing, in this course students will write with a director’s eye, and direct with a writer’s insight. Lead by both writing and directing instructors, students will develop original, character-driven scripts. Working with actors, students will stage their scripts to refine each scene. Casting will also be addressed to help students make decisions on choosing actors for their films. 

CFD-2125
Writing and Directing II
One semester: 3 studio credits
Advancing beyond the work accomplished in CFD-2120, Writing and Directing I, this course will focus on refining scripts for third-year film production. Students work with actors to find depth and nuance in their writing, and develop confidence in their directing. As the scripts produced in the fall semester go into postproduction, films are screened to provide feedback on the editing. 

CFD-2131
Directing Actors
One semester: 3 studio credits
This course will cover practical skills for soliciting great performances from actors by focusing on, and demystifying, the actor/director collaboration. By exploring effective directorial techniques and approaches, students will consider various ways to work effectively—with both experienced actors and novices alike—to elicit spontaneous, authentic and nuanced performances. Script analysis, casting, rehearsal techniques and improvisation will be addressed. Each student will have the opportunity to direct with professional actors. 

CFD-2140
Writing the Feature-Length Script I
One semester: 3 studio credits
Required for all screenwriting majors, this course will focus on constructing a character-driven screenplay in three-acts. Students are introduced to the Writers Guild Short-Form Contract, and develop their scripts through each stage of professional screenwriting processes, including character research, logline, synopsis, outline and drafts. Students will finish a full outline of their screenplay and a first draft of the first act by the end of the semester. 

CFD-2145
Writing the Feature-Length Script II
One semester: 3 studio credits
A continuation of CFD-2140, Writing the Feature-Length Script I, in this course students will revise the first act of their screenplays, and complete the second and third acts. Emphasis is on pacing, knowing what to take out as well as what to put in. Actors may be brought in to explore the dramatic potential in scenes and to help students write natural dialogue. Students will complete a second draft of their screenplay by the end of the semester. 

CFD-2159
Film Criticism
One semester: 3 studio credits
Designed to offer a structure for critical film analysis, this course will examine a variety of approaches to film criticism, and will provide a means for students to analyze their own creative output as well as that of well-known filmmakers. Students will gain insights into how to formulate objective assessments of a particular film or body of work from the perspective that there is not a single “right” way to review a film—whatever the genre. Does the work have an overriding theme? How do style, form and tone relate? Are there any cultural differences that need to be considered? We will screen and assess films in class; writing assignments will be given. 

CFD-2170
Media and Society
One semester: 3 studio credits
This course will provide an introductory understanding of the nature and functions of communications media and its respective influence on us as individuals and as a society. We will consider the cultural meanings conveyed in media and popular entertainment, the concept of social responsibility, media literacy, censorship, advertising, political satire, global perspectives and their impact. Issues raised by the pervasive role of mass media will be examined, including concentration of ownership over public communications and how it affects the process of political persuasion and entertainment content. We will view various social mechanisms that help share the power and role of the media. 

CFD-2202
Acting II
One semester: 3 studio credits
This course is for students who want to increase their thespian skills by working on scenes and monologues. Advanced techniques will be taught as well as communication skills for the actor to collaborate with the director, while staying within the actor/director relationship.

CFD-2262
Creating Character (The Actor/Writer Collaboration)
One semester: 3 studio credits
Great stories rely on great characters. This multidisciplinary course is ideal for aspiring screenwriters and writer/directors who want to write more dynamic character-driven drama. You will work with professional actors and use exciting techniques and exercises to make vivid characters come to life. A unique fusion of directing, writing and acting allows you to create scripts in action and to hone your skills for dialogue, unlocking the mysteries of specific characters. Taught by a screenwriter and an actor/director, the goal of this course is for students to develop exciting new material for film, both short and long form. 

CFD-2350
Adaptation for the Short Film
One semester: 3 studio credits
The challenges in transforming material from other media onto the screen will be the focus of this course. Screenplays may be developed from virtually any source material—fiction, nonfiction, journalism, poetry—and students will investigate how to obtain screen rights for their work, including public domain, options and ownership. Emphasis is on short films that students can produce themselves. 

CFD-2442
Comedy Improvisation
One semester: 3 studio credits
Improvisation is the jazz of theater. It’s spontaneous and creative and an essential acting and life skill. This course will focus on short-form comedy improv. Whether you use it to improve your commercial and theatrical auditions, incorporate it into your rehearsal process, become a better writer, or feel more at ease when speaking in public, improv will free you up and “get you out of your head.” In a supportive and energetic group atmosphere, we will examine the basic elements of improvising a scene and developing characters. Discover the secret of making it look easy. 

CFD-2456
Script Analysis I: Visual Translation for Production Design
One semester: 3 studio credits
The goal of this course is to introduce methods used to create meaningful imagery from screenplays. The process of previsualizing and how to determine the salient points that establish the visual representation of a film will be addressed, beginning with the initial steps of previsualization—from first impression rough-response drawings to pattern-recognition responses. Each student will complete three projects using a variety of mediums, such as watercolor, acrylics, drawing, photography and digital technologies to express ideas for a given production. Toward the end of the semester various design software programs will be presented. 

CFD-2457
Script Analysis II: Visual Translation for Production Design
One semester: 3 studio credits
This course is a continuation CFD-2456, Script Analysis I: Visual Translation for Production Design. Working with Autodesk SketchUp, we will explore how to achieve visual interpretations of scripts and other texts, and how to build a consensual approach to design for a project. Using scripts for film and television, students will take a concept and create physical set solutions from models, drawings, photography and digital technology. 

CFD-2461-A
Drawing and Painting I: Learning to See
One semester: 3 studio credits
This course presents strong individual counsel to guide students toward finding an effective medium to best express a visual response to a script. Basic drawing and painting skills will be taught along with how to utilize various other media, including photography, collage and digital technologies. The course emphasizes collaborating with directors and cinematographers to realize student projects. 

CFD-2462-A
Drawing and Painting II: Learning to See
One semester: 3 studio credits
Basic color theory and how color and light can enhance the dramatic effects on a set will be examined in this course. Each student will employ drawing and painting to create several design projects for narrative film or television projects, including the development of sets for a story theme and the nature of its characters, and how to achieve realistic renderings for the audience. We will also discuss how wardrobe, makeup, hair and props enhance a character. Autodesk Sketchbook and Adobe Photoshop will be taught to enhance each student’s skillset. 

CVD-3010 / CVD-3015
Advanced Production I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

These courses will explore sophisticated and developing languages of the moving image. Through exercises, demonstrations and production, we will focus on the craft, aesthetics and content of film and moving-image making, as practiced in emerging and traditional forms. During the spring semester, each student will undertake a major project or series of smaller projects. Alternatively editing and cinematography majors may function as editors or cinematographers on two, third-year projects. 

CFD-3021 / CFD-3022
Directing Episodic Television I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

The skills required for directing television will be the focus of these courses. Students will film scenes that are common to television dramas: an interrogation, a hospital scene, a love scenario, etc. We will begin with preproduction—schedules, auditions and scouting locations. Students will then prepare for filming with shot lists and tech scouts. Props, production design, wardrobe and script meetings will follow. Sessions on production will include rehearsals, camera placement, point of view and close-ups, and how to work with the director of photography, assistant directors, and other members of the crew. The first semester will end with students filming the same scenes in a variety of styles to understand how to accommodate the specific look of different series. The second semester will address postproduction issues crucial to television, such as pacing, act breaks for commercials, teasers and cliffhangers. We will compare directors’ cuts with producers’ cuts to determine which is better, what changes were made, and why. The challenges of editing will be examined, from close-ups and pre-lapping dialogue to establishing shots and the time considerations for the television format. 

CFD-3030 / CFD-3035
Advanced Lighting and Cinematography I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

Three interrelated areas of cinematography that are essential to the realization of the dramatic demands of the script—visualization of the script, communicating with actors, lighting and postproduction processes—are the focus of these courses. Through demonstrations, discussions, screenings, critiques and hands-on projects, students will explore sophisticated lighting techniques for film and digital cinematography. How to translate ideas into images, experiment with varied lighting styles and create specific moods for interiors and exteriors will be examined, as well as the collaboration between the director and director of photography in planning action scenes, structure, coverage and the interpretation of the script. We will discuss emulsions, tonality, contrast, the “quality” of light, exposure, angles, composition, movement, continuity, lenses, depth of field, filters, special effects, lab liaisons (timing lights, printing, digital mastering and transfers) and managing camera and lighting crews. Arriflex 16-SR camera, advanced digital cameras, super speed lenses, dolly, Jib-arm, Gear head, Steadicam, Tungsten, HMI and Kino-Flo lights will be used in class. 

AHD-3060
Masters of Light
One semester: 3 art history credits
Light is more than an aesthetic choice. It is also the electric bulb, X-rays, the beginning of the world (Genesis), photography, the big bang, cinema, Einstein’s Theory of Relativity and photonics; it is the most important tool we currently use in medicine, communications, engineering and art. This course begins with the history of the physics and science of light and shadow. What exactly is light and when did we define it? What are the differences between artificial and natural light and how did the invention of artificial light change the nature of art and culture? In the second part of the course, each student will give a presentation on a master of light—painter, photographer, filmmaker or light artist. 

CFD-3060 / CFD-3065
Advanced Writing and Directing I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

These advanced workshops fuse writing and directing to help students create their third-year production and thesis films. The goal is to develop highly evolved scripts through a combination of sophisticated writing techniques and directorial strategies. Working with actors on and off camera, students will analyze their artistic choices, and then refine the scripts before shooting their films. In the spring semester, thesis projects will be developed. 

CVD-3060
Editing: Avid II
One semester: 3 studio credits
Advanced editing features and techniques of Avid will be examined. Topics will include: media management, effect editing, multiclip editing, color correction, signal measurement, film-to-tape projects, EDLs and professional output methods. Integration with other programs such as Adobe After Effects, Photoshop and DVD Studio Pro, as well as how to upgrade an Apple Final Cut Pro project to Avid for professional finishing will be explored.

CFD-3130
Pro Tools I
One semester: 3 studio credits
Audio is now firmly within the digital realm. This course will focus on the skills needed to operate within the Pro Tools interface as well as the basics of digital audio. Students will learn how to record dialogue, sound effects, and Foley and synchronize these elements to picture. Signal flow, digital effects, MIDI concepts, file management, audio editing and basic mixing will also be covered. Students will record, create, mix and output mixes for several projects. 

HLD-3130 / HLD-3135
Film and Literature I and II
Two semesters: 3 humanities and sciences credits per semester

From its inception, film has engaged in a complex relationship with literature, often drawing upon as well as influencing the narrative structures developed in literary works that include novels, drama, epic poetry and folk tales. These courses will explore various aspects of the rich interaction among these forms, and will examine different ways that filmmakers increase the depth and nuance of their work by adopting or reinventing literary strategies and techniques. A substantial portion of the courses is devoted to comparing cinematic and literary treatments of a common theme or to examining film adaptations of specific literary works, such as All Quiet on the Western Front, Lolita, Trainspotting, Heart of Darkness (Apocalypse Now), 1984, The Dead, Of Mice and Men, King Lear (Ran), The Grapes of Wrath and Wise Blood. 

CFD-3140 / CFD-3145
Advanced Feature Screenwriting I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

Building upon the core concepts examined in CFD-2140/2145, Writing the Feature-Length Script I and II, these courses will encompass various stages of script development, including character studies, treatments and outlines to produce a fully realized script. Students become familiar with the three-act structure, and we will move beyond convention to create strong, original work. Students will also work with actors to create more complex characters and improve dialogue. 

CFD-3170 / CFD-3175
Writing for Television I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

The first semester of these intensive courses in writing for television will begin with writing a spec script (hour or half hour) for an existing television show. Treatments, synopsis, story outlines, the pitch, log lines and career strategies will all be addressed and explored. Guest lecturers, both producers and writers, will share their experiences and offer strategies on how to break into the television market. In the spring semester, students will create and write original pilot episodes for their own television show. 

CFD-3180
Pro Tools II: Sound Design
One semester: 3 studio credits
Preparing audio sessions for output to presentation formats using groups, sub mixes, advanced plug-in and automation techniques will be the focus of this course. Students will learn how to troubleshoot technical issues that arise when synchronizing sound and image. The craft of mixing for postproduction will be thoroughly discussed and explored. 

CFD-3190
The Business and Craft of Writing for Television
One semester: 3 studio credits
This course will focus on writing scripts for episodic television and will cover developing ideas, preparing a proposal, pitching the project, writing and rewriting, dealing with studios and networks, and collaborating with directors and actors. Students will focus on developing a TV pilot. 

CFD-3194
Creative Producing
One semester: 3 studio credits
This course will explore the responsibilities of the creative producer from project inception through distribution. Students will learn how to manage a project and about the principles and tools for creating and controlling their own work, as well as how to collaborate successfully with other film professionals and remain true to their artistic vision. From selecting the material, working with the writer, hiring the director, collaborating on casting choices and selecting a production crew to involvement with distribution and marketing strategies, the focus will be on the creative skill and business acumen necessary to be a successful producer. Guest speakers will share their insights into producing for the film and television industries. Both narrative and documentary filmmaking will be examined. 

CFD-3197
Film and Animation Collaboration Workshop
One semester: 3 studio credits
This course is design to nurture collaborations in film and animation through scene exercises under the guidance of the instructors. Each session will provide opportunities for students to step outside of their specialization and bring their skillsets together toward creating real production scene work. Both animation and film students will study film language, visual structure, film set techniques, camera movement, lighting and working with actors. Animation students will create storyboards and draw the sets for the scenes. Film students will collaborate directly with the storyboard artist to better understand the psychology of a frame and how to maximize every camera position and shot composition. 

CFD-3230
Art of Editing
One semester: 3 studio credits
This survey into the creative processes of postproduction will explore strategies to assist in recognizing problems in story, scene, sequence and structure, and then uncover the paths to constructive solutions. The course will encompass all film forms, including narrative, documentary, commercial spots, industrials and music videos. What is constant in all good work, and how visual and aural elements can be rhythmically integrated to produce inspired editing will be addressed. 

CFD-3241
Advanced Production Design
One semester: 3 studio credits
Transforming the physical and psychological environments of a student’s script into the visual reality of his or her own film will be explored in this course. Students will bring in scenes from their scripts to explore subtext, analyze character and discuss theme. Through sketches, location scouting, dressing the set, defining construction needs and research, students will begin the process of building an environmental visual palette for their story. Attention will be given to the psychology of the characters in order to study the impact of the characters on their environment and the environment’s effect on the characters. 

CFD-3258
Advanced Makeup for Film and Television: Prosthesis
One semester: 3 studio credits
The world of makeup goes beyond color and powder when the artist has the skill to alter the structure of a face using prosthetic appliances. This hands-on course will explore the materials and techniques of prosthetic fabrication and application. Students will design, sculpt, mold and cast a full-face prosthetic appliance, and use the resulting piece as a building block for other projects in prosthetic/visual effects makeup. 

CFD-3326 / CFD-3327
Advanced Documentary Workshop I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

These courses build on the material explored in CFD-2018, Documentary Workshop II. Students will create documentaries and have the opportunity to pitch a project, develop a treatment, formulate a budget and funding plan, discuss film festivals and distribution strategy for their own productions. Broadcast professionals will lecture and offer critiques of student projects. Students will also work in crew positions and participate in class projects. 

CFD-3418
Writing the One-Act Play
One semester: 3 studio credits
This course is designed to explore writing for the theater, in both traditional and experimental ways. Students will be given assignments that emphasize structure, character, story and plot. Making use of theater’s unique possibilities in telling a story will also be emphasized: the static and moving images created specifically for their effect on the eye and mind of the audience; the sound and play of language and how speech is connected to character; and, finally, the ways that theater can call attention to itself as play, whether breaking conventions of reality, breaking the fourth wall, or breaking into song. Student will complete a one-act play. 

CFD-3426
Recording Foley and Effects
One semester: 3 studio credits
While production and location recordists strive to create the best dialogue from a film shoot, subsequent editing can result in the loss of sound that gives a scene its character. Using a variety of props, shoes, surfaces and fabrics, Foley artists recreate these “lost sounds” for film, video and, increasingly, video games in a controlled studio environment. This intensive workshop will focus on the techniques and practices of Foley artistry. Microphone placement; recording; and the craft of convincingly mimicking footsteps, clothing movements, and scene-specific sounds will be covered. Students will create the audio from actual film and television scenes, as well as record and design effects for video games. 

CFD-3428
DaVinci Resolve: Color Correcting Your Film
One semester: 3 studio credits
The fundamentals of color grading and finishing with DaVinci Resolve software will be covered in this course. Students will explore the process of color grading from picture lock to final delivery. Topics include: creating a look for a project, enhancing storytelling by drawing the eye, scene matching and project management. The course will focus on both the technical and aesthetic requirements of finishing projects for broadcast, commercial and theatrical release. 

CFD-3431
Sound and Music Techniques
One semester: 3 studio credits
You don’t have to be a professional musician to make great sound tracks for your films and videos. With a keyboard and cutting-edge computer software programs such as Reason and Pro Tools, you can create great music to sync with your images. Students will have hands-on experience in a recording studio and will learn techniques of digital recording, editing and mixing. How to use prerecorded loops and effects in various musical styles—hip-hop, world, jazz, rock, classical, among others—will also be covered. If you are a musician, you can enhance your compositions with these amazing tools. 

CFD-3432
Postproduction: The Digital Workflow
One semester: 3 studio credits
Postproduction professionals must be fluent in the digital language of filmmaking for their creative projects. This course will address the technical side of postproduction and the principles integral to digital cinema workflows. Through lectures, screenings and assignments, students will explore how to problem solve technical hurdles. Subjects will include discussions on computer technology, storage options, resolutions, frame rates, color space, codecs, compression techniques, DCPs, RED RAW workflow, aspect ratios, Pro Tools output and delivery, camera media, color grading, bit depth and bitrate. This is an indispensible course for editors.

CFD-3434
Postproduction: Structures in Storytelling
One semester: 3 studio credits
Inspired by the teachings of Sergei Eisenstein, Stefan Sharff, Karel Reisz, Andrei Tarkovsky, Alexander Mackendrick, Ingmar Bergman and Akira Kurosawa, this course will offer an advanced study into aesthetic solutions to shape image and sound compositions. An emphasis will be placed on the applications and significance of European montage. With a concentration on crafting a visual story via elements that are concurrently cohesive and divergent, we will screen student projects, theatrical releases and trailers, as well as discuss assigned readings in film criticism. The goal of the course is to master the elusive properties of moving-image editing.

CFD-3512
Film and Entertainment Law
One semester: 3 studio credits
This course will focus on the fundamentals of entertainment law by exploring the business and legal relationships within the broadcasting and film industries. How to anticipate and avoid legal problems prior to production will be addressed. Key issues in the areas of copyright law, sources of financing, distribution agreements, insurance and union consideration will be discussed. There will be guest speakers from the field.

CFD-3614
Line Producing and Budgeting for Your Film
One semester: 3 studio credits
This course will address the process of professionally managing a film project from development to distribution. Using EP software, we will cover such topics as breaking down a script, creating schedules and a realistic budget, as well as how to access information concerning the most up-to-date union rates, actor agreements and location fees. Students will complete a professional production book relating to short or feature film. 

CFD-3619
Producing the Horror Film
One semester: 3 studio credits
What do long-established filmmakers such as Francis Ford Coppola, Steven Spielberg, Peter Bogdanovich, John Sayles and Oliver Stone have in common with directors like Guillermo del Toro, Peter Jackson and Sam Raimi? They all jump-started their careers by making a horror film (or two), and then moved on to other genres once their debut feature had given them a solid reputation to build upon. he horror genre has an acknowledged, broad appeal for adolescents and young adults. It ‘travels’ extraordinarily well worldwide, even given the shifting sands of the marketplace. Horror relies for success not on ‘star value’—the genre itself is its selling point. And, depending as these films do on elements such as lighting, editing and sound design, which don’t inflate budgets sky-high, they are an ideal and relatively safe entry point for neophyte filmmakers. This course will examine how to produce effective horror films, and will include screenings of recent, effective examples and guests from the industry. 

CFD-3921
Finance and Distribution
One semester: 3 studio credits
This course will explore sources of financing and distribution and the resources, materials and methods to attain them. We will begin with the budgeting process and production costs to publicity, marketing, delivery, legal costs, and other—often overlooked—areas that can come back to haunt you. The tried-and-true sources of financing will be reviewed, and students will investigate other financing techniques. We will practice the art of sales—from creating a prospectus to marketing and publicity, prospecting for investors and pitching the project. 

CFD-4010
Career Strategies
One semester: 3 studio credits
The goal of this course is to facilitate the successful transition from college to the professional world. Experts from key areas in the entertainment industry will provide insight in all areas of film specialization, covering such subjects as intellectual property rights, marketing and promotion, finance, agents, producer reps and distributors: the tactical information necessary to move your career to the next level. Emphasis will be given to each student’s work, and on creating a market identity through social media and other strategies. 

CFD-4040 / CFD-4045
Master Class in Screenwriting I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester
These courses are geared toward building a supportive community of working screenwriters. Students will develop a feature-length screenplay based on an original idea, and polish it to a professional-quality writing sample. All common contractual steps of writing will be observed, including treatments, outlines and revisions. Guest lecturers, including writers and agents, will discuss making the transition from school to working professionally.

CFD-4101 / CFD-4102
Master Class in Cinematography I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester
These courses are designed to challenge thesis cinematography students to refine their lighting skills by reproducing scenes from paintings by masters. Recent theorists and artists such as David Hockney contend that painters like Vermeer used optics in the form of lenses and mirrors to create distortions and soft focus effects that could not be seen by the naked eye. Included will be Georges de la Tour’s paintings with stunning candlelight scenes, the heightened naturalism and strong lighting in Caravaggio’s work, and John Singer Sargent’s use of precise patina to reveal mood and psychological nuance. Lectures by a distinguished group of guest cinematographers will complement course work. 

CFD-4116 / CFD-4117
Master Class in Documentary I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

In these advanced theory and production courses students will produce a documentary of up to 50 minutes in length. Scripts, rushes and editing stages will be critiqued in class. Films from a variety of genres will be discussed and subjects will run the gamut of documentary techniques. Guest directors will discuss their work. 

CFD-4151 / CFD-4152
The Business and Craft of Writing for Television I and II
Two semesters: 3 studio credits per semester

These courses will focus on writing scripts for episodic television and will cover developing ideas, preparing a proposal, pitching the project, writing and rewriting, dealing with studios and networks, and collaborating with directors and actors. Students will focus on developing a TV pilot. 

CFD-4940 / CFD-4945
Film Thesis I and II
Two semesters: 6 studio credits per semester

Students are required to complete a thesis project that demonstrates an advanced level of craft and technique. All candidates will meet with the Thesis Committee at the end of their third year for instructions and deadlines. The College may reproduce work in matters pertaining to accreditation and promotion. 

CFD-4950 / CFD-4955
Screenwriting Thesis I and II
Two semesters: 6 studio credits per semester

Students are required to complete a thesis project that demonstrates an advanced level of craft and technique. All candidates will meet with the Thesis Committee at the end of their third year for instructions and deadlines. The College may reproduce work in matters pertaining to accreditation and promotion. 

Independent Study
One semester: 3 studio credits
Junior or senior students who wish to pursue a special project not covered by the parameters of their department’s curriculum are eligible to apply for an independent study course. Students must have earned a grade point average above 3.00 at SVA, and must submit their study goals as a detailed proposal for approval by the department chair. Proposals for an independent study must be made prior to the course adjustment period for that semester. Please contact the department advisor for specifics. 

Internship
One semester: 3 studio credits
Students can gain valuable experience and broaden their professional network through an internship with a sponsor/employer. Internships for credit are available to juniors and seniors who have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.25 or better. To receive credit, students must get approval in advance from their department chair, academic advisor and the internship manager. Students must work a minimum of 150 hours (10 hours per week), participate in a weekly online discussion board with other SVA interns, complete self-evaluations and a final project. Elective studio credit is awarded for the successful completion of an internship.

 

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