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The MFA program in Photography, Video and Related Media is dedicated to the creative practice of the lens-based arts. We encourage diversity in our student body, and welcome applicants from a wide range of educational and professional backgrounds.

The program is designed for full-time study over a two- or three-year period. Candidates for the Master of Fine Arts degree must complete at least 60 credits and all course requirements, maintain a 3.3 grade point average and produce a successful thesis project to be eligible for degree conferral. Students are approved to proceed to each successive level of study based on yearly faculty assessments.

Students personalize their program from a wide variety of electives. Certain courses in other SVA graduate departments are also available as electives to qualified students.

Two-Year Program Requirements
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS, TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
 

• Successful completion of 60 credits, including all required courses, administrative requirements and the thesis project and paper. Documentation of all thesis projects must be on file in the MFA Photography, Video and Related Media Department to be eligible for degree conferral.

• A matriculation of two academic years. Students must complete their degree within four years, unless given an official extension by the provost.

• Students are required to maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.3 (B+) and pass all end-of-year evaluations in order to remain in good academic standing.

Entering students must have basic computer skills, a practical understanding of the Macintosh computer, a working knowledge of Adobe Photoshop and a basic understanding of Adobe InDesign and Illustrator. Summer workshops are available at SVA for students without this background. Prior to the beginning of classes, students must have read all required books on a reading list.

   Students must have their own Macintosh laptop with the most recent version of Adobe Creative Cloud installed. Additionally, all students must have, at minimum, two 1TB external hard drives, one portable and one for back-up. Students must also supply their own SD and/or CF cards. The department provides access to a comprehensive array of photography and video equipment including printers, scanners, cameras and presentation tools. Students can contact the department with any purchasing questions. 

Note: Departmental requirements are subject to change by the department chair if the chair deems that such change is warranted


FIRST-YEAR COURSE REQUIREMENTS
 
PHG-5025             Studio: Related Media
PHG-5030-5032    Critique 
PHG-5035-5039    Critique
PHG-5051-5056    Historical Perspectives
PHG-5071-5078    Criticism and Theory
PHG-5091-5099*  Contemporary Issues
PHG-5402*           Studio: Imaging I
PHG-5406*           Studio: Imaging II

                                Scheimpflug Lecture Series 

* Note: Students working in video must register for PHG-5404, Studio: Digital Imaging I—Moving Image, PHG-5610, Studio: Video Projects I, and PHG-5615, Studio: Video Projects II. It is recommended that video specialists also register for PHG-5093-A, Contemporary Issues: Video Culture. 

SECOND-YEAR COURSE REQUIREMENTS

PHG-6030             Master Critique
PHG-6050             Thesis Forms I
PHG-6070             Thesis Forms II
PHG-6200             Thesis Project
PHG-6210             Thesis Project: Presentation

                                  Scheimpflug Lecture Series 

Three-Year Program Requirements
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS, THREE-YEAR PROGRAM
 

• Successful completion of 72 credits, including all required courses and administrative requirements. 

• A matriculation of three academic years. Students must complete their degree within six years, unless given an official extension by the provost.

 • Successful completion of the thesis project and paper. Documentation of all thesis projects must be on file in the MFA Photography, Video and Related Media Department to be eligible for degree conferral. 

• Students are required to maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.3 (B+) and pass all end-of-year evaluations in order to remain in good academic standing. 

Entering students must have basic computer skills, a practical understanding of the Macintosh computer, a working knowledge of Adobe Photoshop and a basic understanding of Adobe InDesign and Illustrator. Summer workshops are available at SVA for students without this background. Prior to the beginning of classes, students must have read all required books on a reading list.

   Students must have their own Macintosh laptop with the most recent version of Adobe Creative Cloud installed. Additionally, all students must have, at minimum, two 1TB external hard drives, one portable and one for back-up. Students must also supply their own SD and/or CF cards. The department provides access to a comprehensive array of photography and video equipment including printers, scanners, cameras and presentation tools. Students can contact the department with any purchasing questions.

Note: Departmental requirements are subject to change by the department chair if the chair deems that such change is warranted.

FIRST-YEAR COURSE REQUIREMENTS

PHG-5010  Bases of Critique

PHG-5041  The Social History of Photography
  or  AHG-5302  History of Video Art: 1965 to 1985

PHG-5042  The Aesthetic History of Photography
  or  AHG-5303 History of Video Art: 1985 to Present  

PHG-5035-5039  Critique
PHG-5402* Studio: Imaging I
PHG-5406* Studio: Imaging II
PHG-5046   Modern Art I
PHG-5047   Modern Art II
PHG-5413* Studio: The Laws of Light and How to Break Them

                        Scheimpflug Lecture Series  

* Note: Students working in video must contact their department advisor to see which studio courses are best suited to their practice. 

SECOND-YEAR COURSE REQUIREMENTS

PHG-5025              Studio: Related Media
PHG-5030-5032     Critique
P
HG-5051-5056     Historical Perspectives
PHG-5071-5078     Criticism and Theory
PHG-5035-5038     Critique
PHG-5091-5099*   Contemporary Issues

                                   Scheimpflug Lecture Series 

* Note: It is recommended that video specialists register for PHG-5093, Contemporary Issues: Video Culture. 

THIRD-YEAR COURSE REQUIREMENTS

PHG-6030     Master Critique
PHG-6050     Thesis Forms I
PHG-6070     Thesis Forms II
PHG-6200     Thesis Project
PHG-6210     Thesis Project: Presentation

                        







General Course Listing

PHG-5010
Bases of Critique
Fall semester: 3 credits
This group critique provides a stimulus for creative exchange and a forum for students to focus their individual growth and activities during the first year. Guided by prominent figures in the visual arts, the structure and content of meetings is determined largely by student needs. 

PHG-5025
Studio: Related Media
Fall semester: 3 credits
This course will introduce students to a variety of tools and platforms at the forefront of lens-based imaging. It will combine readings and discussions with hands-on tutorials. Beginning with a discussion of technology and its relation to art practice, the class will move on to explore the following topics: coding for artists, 3D capture and printing, computational photography, VR and immersive video technologies. Guest lectures will supplement the material covered in class. 

PHG-5030 through PHG-5039
Critique
Two semesters: 3 credits per semester
Critique seminars are a focal point of any given semester. Guided by prominent figures in the visual arts, and assisted by their peers, students will concentrate on producing a coherent body of work that best reflects their individual talents and challenges the current boundaries of their media. The program is designed to expose students to divergent points of view. Note: Students in the two-year program must take one section of Critique each semester. Students in the three-year program must take one semester of Critique in the spring semester. Three-year students cannot repeat the section of Critique taken in their first year. 

PHG-5041
The Social History of Photography
Fall semester: 3 credits
Photography manifests a distinct desire to capture and represent the entire world. Through a thematic survey of photography from its invention to the mid-20th century, this course examines its early practitioners and uses of photography as it spreads from private to public spheres. The rapidity with which photography spread will be discussed in relation to nascent consumer culture, myriad applications in the sciences and industry, colonial expansion, and snapshots and candid imagery, among other topics. A research paper and short in-class presentation will be required. 

PHG-5042
The Aesthetic History of Photography
Spring semester: 3 credits
This course examines the history of photography from the perspective of aesthetic theory and networks of crossovers with fine arts, particularly with respect to avant-garde painting of the 19th century and experimental art practices throughout the 20th century. We also consider the historiography of photography, with an eye toward revisionist texts that valorize women’s practices and colonial usages, as well as key exhibitions and collections that facilitate the canonization of photography as bona fide fine art. What criteria apply when photographs function or are designated as fine art? This and other questions that arise will point us to an exploration of present-day issues. A research paper and short presentation will be required. 

PHG-5046
Modern Art I
Fall semester: 3 credits
The emergence of the avant-garde as it develops in Europe and morphs into international modernism is the focus of this course. We begin with the Academic tradition, and work from neo-classicism to romanticism and realism with an eye to political revolution and tumultuous social change. From impressionism to post-impressionism to Fauve, we take measure of art’s engagement with the issues of the day: new urbanism, questions about class, consumerism and mass culture, and the rise of entertainment culture, among others. By the end of the 19th century, emphasis in symbolism on personal experience opens new doors concerning art’s narrative and expressive capacity. Assigned museum visits and writings will complement in-class work. 

PHG-5047
Modern Art II
Spring semester: 3 credits
This course surveys modern art of the 20th century, beginning with the influences that underwrite the developments of the historical avant-garde and culminate in cubism, Dada, expressionism, surrealism, suprematism and constructivism, De Stijl and the Bauhaus. Throughout these congruent movements we find scattered the seeds of the present in the form of performance art, installation and social sculpture, as well as conceptual practices that include the mobilization of identity as artistic material. We also undertake an examination of art at mid-century, including abstract expressionism, pop, minimalism and conceptual art, which takes us into the 1960s. Assigned museum visits and writings will complement in-class work.

PHG-5051
Historical Perspectives: Past Tense, Present Tense
Fall semester: 3 credits
An exploration of photography’s shifting relationship with several key topics that have played a central role in the history of the medium is the focus of this course. These topics will provide a lens with which we can explore our continued, and often complicated, engagement with the past. Issues to be addressed will include: photographic abstraction, the role of creative communities (e.g., Black Mountain College), the road as subject and metaphor, Africa as photographic subject and creator, the archive and modern consciousness and the artist as curator. In addition to readings and discussions, distinguished guests will help us to consider subjects from their professional perspectives. 

PHG-5054
Historical Perspectives: Issues in the Moving Image—A History of Hybrids
Spring semester: 3 credits
 “Cinema is truth 24 frames per second,” remarked Jean-Luc Godard, begging the question of whether truth is an attribute of fiction or documentary. Throughout his 45-years-thus-far career, Godard—more rigorously and prolifically than any other filmmaker—blurred the presumed boundaries between so-called “fiction,” documentary, ethnographic, pornographic and avant-garde films. His work will be central to this course, as will the films of Andy Warhol. We’ll also look at work by Chris Marker, Orson Welles, Harun Farocki, Alan Clarke, Nick Broomfield, Jonas Mekas, Yvonne Rainer, Alain Resnais, Guy Debord, Werner Herzog, Jean-Pierre Gorin, Chantal Akerman, Robert Frank and Craig Baldwin. Weekly screenings and reading assignments will be required. A 1,000-word paper at mid-semester, and a longer paper at the end of the semester, will be required. 

PHG-5056
Historical Perspectives: The Lens and Visual Arts, 1950s to the 1980s
Fall semester: 3 credits
This course will map a history of contemporary art via the medium of photography. Since 1960, photography and photo-based media—including video and film—have been central to the practice and theory of art. We will track the various ways that photographic images have been incorporated into contemporary art, as well as examine the discourse around photographic reproduction that has been integral to postmodernism and poststructuralist theory. Artists to be discussed include: Nam June Paik, Robert Rauschenberg, Yves Klein, Andy Warhol, Ed Ruscha, Sherrie Levine, Mel Bochner, Robert Smithson, Vito Acconci, Martha Rosler, Hans Haacke, Jeff Wall, Cindy Sherman, Richard Prince, Barbara Kruger, Mary Kelly, Annette Messager, Christian Boltanski, Sophie Calle, Adrian Piper, Robert Mapplethorpe, Nan Goldin, Bernd and Hilla Becher. Each session will consist of a lecture and discussion about critical readings that illuminate the work of a specific group of artists. Presentations on topics related to the subject of the course are required. 

PHG-5071
Criticism and Theory: Contemporary Criticism
Fall semester: 3 credits
This course is designed to examine both general and specific areas of critical discourse. The first project is to examine the distinctions between commonly used terms such as “history,” “analysis,” “theory,” “criticism” and “critical theory” in broad, but grounded, terms. The second project is to delineate the concepts of modernism and postmodernism by tracing the development of specific methodologies such as formalism, Marxism, semiotics, literary theory, structuralism and post­structuralism, deconstruction, feminism and psychoanalysis. This mix also provides location of emerging discourses in cultural studies, and issues of imaging and representation. Understanding the issues as an interrelated history of ideas will be emphasized. 

PHG-5073
Criticism and Theory: Critical Reading
Fall semester: 3 credits
This course will combine a format of reading and classroom discussions aimed at providing critical perspectives on the issues that inform the practice of contemporary art and photography. Readings include texts by artists, writers and theorists of the past three decades that bear upon the practice of the students’ art-making today. Students will be required to develop a framework from these readings that is relevant to their own objectives. Discussion will be based on interdisciplinary study, screenings and exhibitions. 

PHG-5076
Criticism and Theory: Technology, Technics and Temporality
Fall semester: 3 credits
Technology has been thought of as being without an ontology, it concerns appearances rather than being. In this course, we will show how the meaning of techne—a poetic bringing into being—has been obscured by the instrumental use of modern technology, in particular media or optical technology. The history of technology is often presented as a progressive scheme inside a historical framework—the idea of technology as something that just keeps improving. This idea surfaces even in dystopian visions of the future, which project a society ruined by an advanced dominant technology. Our ideas about technology mask the extent to which technology itself drives these ideas. We are subject to technology not so much physically (the slave of the machine, the prisoner in the Panopticon), as metaphysically, in the ways we internalize and enact its ideas. The course looks closely at some of the areas where ideas of and from technology are having great cultural impact. Prerequisite: one criticism and theory course. 

PHG-5078
Criticism and Theory: Global Issues and Strategies
Spring semester: 3 credits
The course is designed to examine changing currents in a world understood as complex, variant and global, with no specific path or set of standards for the creation of images. We will identify themes, issues and artists from global and comparative perspectives. The issues may derive from art, art history and sources such as cultural and commercial practices, geopolitics, topical events and current intellectual trends. The purpose is to explore contemporary issues, images, contexts and challenges in relation to image-making in any media. Readings will be discussed for context, and to broaden personal orientations and strategies. Students will help select topics and direct reading sessions, and will produce a paper (print, hypertext, or image essay) that explores a theme relevant to their own interests and uses strategies different from their previous orientation to image production. 

PHG-5092
Contemporary Issues: Pics or It Didn’t Happen: Art After the Internet
Fall semester: 3 credits
How do we produce, disseminate and exchange images? How does the Internet challenge art conventions? This course is focused on the troubled relation between contemporary art and the Internet. We will analyze dozens of artworks from the mid-90s to today and stimulate group discussion around the latest critical issues in contemporary art and media theory. Special attention will be given to how the Internet is reshaping art: its production, distribution and how we experience it. Versions, dispersion and collaboration versus originality, uniqueness, and authorship in art are crucial elements for class discussion. We will examine works by artists who use digital media to produce art or, inversely, use conventional media to explore the digitized condition of contemporary life. Topics include: postproduction, Net Art, Surf Clubs, post-Internet, branding vs. invisibility, meme-making, Internet ugly, images circulation, crowdsourcing, performing on the Internet, data mining, surveillance and anonymity. 

PHG-5093
Contemporary Issues: Video Culture
Spring semester: 3 credits
This course will immerse students in the modalities of video practice that have shaped currents in our contemporary cultures. This includes video’s dominant role in documentary and public dialogue, its antecedents in film histories, and its emergence as an art/installation and multimedia performance medium. Drawing on screenings of video works and on artists’ writings, we will examine the many issues surrounding the act of contemporary video-making. Questions to be raised include: Why make video? What is at stake in a particular video? Why make it this way? Where is it made to be shown? Where will it, in fact, be shown? What are the expectations of the audience and what then is the strategy of the maker? 

PHG-5094
Contemporary Issues: Right Here, Right Now
Spring semester: 3 credits
This course offers a forum to research, debate and unravel some of the pressing issues that affect contemporary photographers. Each week, we will concentrate on a question or a theme that is crucial to contemporary practitioners. Subjects include: does size matter?; contemporary print aesthetics; the return of black-and-white; the new color: where has editorial gone?; the power of the edit; roles of nostalgia in a digital era. Through lectures and readings, we will connect contemporary photography with historical precedents, and through discussions explore these connections to each student’s photographic practice.

PHG-5096
Contemporary Issues: Past and Future Looking
Spring semester: 3 credits
Marshall McLuhan proposed that the true subject of any medium is the mediums preceding it. More recently, software and the shift to digital have profoundly shaped how we understand the lens-based arts as a medium and what it can do. This course will chart the evolving nature of this art form with an emphasis on contemporary work in computational photography, 3D-CGI, and other new imaging techniques. Our discussions will draw from artists and thinkers as diverse as Cory Arcangel, Paul Chan, Jeff Desom, Mary Ann Doane, Harun Farocki, Ryoji Ikeda, Friedrich Kittler, Takashi Makino, Lev Manovich, Christian Marclay, James Nares, Trevor Paglen, Deb Roy, Thomas Ruff, Joachim Sauter and Dirk Lüsebrink, Jennifer Steinkamp, Hito Steyerl, Jordan Wolfson, Xu Yong and The Yes Men. Additionally, computational workflows will be discussed, demonstrated and workshopped using iPhone apps and Adobe Creative Cloud. There will be short-form studio projects incorporated into the class that will explore a range of representative computational workflows. This low difficulty research will approach emerging optical tech as an art-making activity. 

PHG-5097
Contemporary Issues: Moving Image Colloquia
Spring semester: 3 credits
This course will consist of professional presentations and workshops in topics that relate to the theory, development, production, postproduction and distribution of video. Visiting professionals will be an integral component of the colloquia. 

PHG-5098
Pass it Around: Visual Culture in the Age of Social Media
Fall semester: 3 credits
This course will explore the increasingly important relationship between visual culture and social media, with an emphasis on understanding the profound effect that the shift from analog to digital technology has had on how we make, look at, talk about and distribute images in contemporary culture. Focusing on the numerous ways in which individuals and social organizations engage with the vast archive of digital content circulating on the Internet, we will touch on a variety of interrelated issues around contemporary image-culture. Sessions will include lectures, discussions and studio work online and off. Students will be encouraged to apply the material discussed in class to their own visual and conceptual interests.

AHG-5302
History of Video Art: 1965 to 1985
Fall semester: 3 credits
What is referred to as “video art” has become a ubiquitous feature of 21st-century art practice, yet it is an art form whose emergence is still a relatively fresh aspect of contemporary art history. This course will explore the origins of video art, examining its sources in film, photography and performance art. Through screenings of key works; discussion with artists, critics and curators, and in directed readings, students will be exposed to important works and individuals associated with the first two decades of video. Special attention will be paid to an understanding of the cultural and social context that supported the emergence of video art. We will focus upon the evolution of video art from both a technological perspective as well as the development of a video’s critical and institutional framework. Artists whose works will be viewed and discussed include Nam June Paik, Wolf Vostell, Bruce Nauman, Yoko Ono, Peter Campus, Vito Acconci, Frank Gillette, Juan Downey, Joan Jonas, Chris Burden, Lynda Benglis, Ira Schneider, Andy Mann, Martha Rosler, Allan Sekula, Shigeko Kubota, Bill Viola, Gary Hill, Mary Lucier, Woody and Steina Vasulka, Ilene Segalove, William Wegman, Tony Oursler, Antoni Muntadas, Keith Sonnier, Bruce and Norman Yonemoto, Dara Birnbaum, Ant Farm, Videofreex, TVTV, Marcel Odenbach, Dan Graham, Doug Hall, Richard Serra, Howard Fried, Terry Fox, Paul Kos, Paul McCarthy, Mike Kelley and Ernie Kovacs.

AHG-5303
History of Video Art: 1985 to Present
Spring semester: 3 credits
As video art became more widely accepted and the tools became increasingly affordable and available, the medium quickly emerged as a primary site for the global dialogue that characterizes contemporary art practice. Among the topics to be addressed in this screening, lecture and discussion course will be the emergence of Asian, Latin American and European Video Art, the continued development of sculptural video installation work and the emergence of the market for video art. The blurring of the lines among video art digital art forms, digital cinema and art made for the Internet will also be addressed. Artists whose works will be viewed and discussed include Nam June Paik, Wolf Vostell, Bruce Nauman, Yoko Ono, Peter Campus, Vito Acconci, Frank Gillette, Juan Downey, Joan Jonas, Chris Burden, Lynda Benglis, Ira Schneider, Andy Mann, Martha Rosler, Allan Sekula, Shigeko Kubota, Bill Viola, Gary Hill, Mary Lucier, Woody and Steina Vasulka, Ilene Segalove, William Wegman, Tony Oursler, Antoni Muntadas, Keith Sonnier, Bruce and Norman Yonemoto, Dara Birnbaum, Ant Farm, Videofreex, TVTV, Marcel Odenbach, Dan Graham, Doug Hall, Richard Serra, Terry Fox, Howard Fried, Paul Kos, Paul McCarthy, Mike Kelley and Ernie Kovacs.

PHG-5402 / PHG-5406
Studio: Imaging I and II
Two semesters: 3 credits per semester
The theory and practice of digital imaging will be explored in these courses. The use of digital cameras; flatbed and film scanners; enhancement of images for various output options; tonal and color correction, color management, restoration and retouching techniques will be addressed, with a focus on creative masking and compositing techniques to create images from multiple image sources. Creating photo-real and surreal composites, exploring abstract panoramic image-making and creating a body of work that is well-executed from concept to presentation will also be included.

PHG-5404
Studio: Imaging I—Moving Image
Fall semester: 3 credits
This course will explore the theory and practice of digital production and post-production for the moving image. It will concentrate on specific applications including Apple Final Cut Pro, Adobe After Effects, DVD Studio and Adobe Flash, as well as on traditional and web-based distribution strategies. 

PHG-5411-A
Studio: Introduction to Video
Spring semester: 3 credits
While photography and video share many basic traits, they also differ in a variety of ways. For example, video is a time-based medium, and an electronic technology; composition includes movement of the frame and within the frame; and the editing of images is central to the process. This course explores such considerations through assigned exercises, and culminates in the production of two video projects during the semester. It also prepares students for advanced video and multimedia courses. 

PHG-5413
Studio: The Laws of Light and How to Break Them
Fall semester: 3 creditshis course is an opportunity to learn the laws of light and to gain an appreciation of how important an understanding of light is to a photographer’s process. We begin with an exploration of the physics of light in order to explain its behavior. Sessions and assignments will teach students to approach every lighting experience with confidence. The purpose is to master these concepts and to ensure effective application of this knowledge. The ability to problem solve is a crucial element when faced with challenging lighting situations. Without this understanding it is very difficult to move beyond obvious limitations. The ultimate goal is to be able to apply these concepts and then to see all the possibilities. 

PHG-5414
Studio: Solving the Mysteries of Light
Spring semester: 3 credits
The goal of this course is for each student to develop a unique style. This will be achieved through discussions on photographs that students bring to class, along with an evaluation of how the lighting was achieved. Each session will include a lighting demonstration, based on student concerns. Students will also bring in photographs for which they want to emulate the lighting, along with sketches showing their best assessment of how the lighting was achieved. Through class discussion, new sketches will be developed. Assignments are based on the photographs brought to class and the revised lighting sketches that evolve. Each student will submit a notebook at the end of the semester. 

PHG-5416
Studio: Photo Books—Past, Present and Future
Fall semester: 3 credits
This course aims to expand each student’s sense of the possibilities of the photo book, from its 20th-century history to recent ebooks and book apps. Students will produce their own printed books and iBooks.

PHG-5437
Pictures in Space
Fall semester: 3 credits
Starting with the idea of lens-based imagery as material, this course pushes the boundaries of photography and video beyond the print and the single-channel screen. This will be achieved by looking at the way images can be presented in real and virtual spaces. The course will be divided into three areas of focus—new media, installation and digital sculpture techniques—that will be investigated through hands-on demonstration, fabrication in the lab and class exercises. Students will produce an installation project, a web/interactive project, a digital 3D project and a final project that incorporates one or all of these approaches.

 

PHG-5491

How to Fail Better

Spring semester: 3 credits

Are you bored with your own work? Confused about where to go next? Do people nod off during your critiques? Are you comfortable with your process even before you’ve found one (do you have it all figured out)? Are you afraid to try new things? Have you read “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” at least 25 times? If so, you could be failing. And we all could be failing better. Participants will engage in a series of projects, discussions and critiques where risk and error are encouraged. This class examines what it means to court failure and challenges the students to question the possibility of success. 

PHG-5610 / PHG-5615
Studio: Video Projects I and II
Two semesters: 3 credits per semester
Craft is the combination of picture, movement, sound, sequence and texts that we use to communicate in the moving image. It is also in itself content. This project-driven course will delve into video production and help prepare students for advanced video and multimedia courses. We will examine the foundations of video-making and explore working in a time-based medium. In the fall semester, editing, lighting and sequencing will be focal points. The spring semester will emphasize advanced workflows, equipment and techniques through practical demonstrations, exercises and assignments. 

PHG-5623
Studio: Video Editing
Spring semester: 3 credits
Video editing is the arrangement of disparate pieces of image and sound within a sequence. This course will demystify the editing experience, allowing the process to become one in which students have the freedom to make confident decisions that are motivated by aesthetic and style choices. Excerpts from a variety of films and videos will be screened to provide a fundamental understanding of editing styles, aesthetics and techniques. Practical assignments will assist in the development of a personal style and approach to editing. Topics will cover theories of montage, time management (on screen and within the process itself), sound design and the use of music and graphics, match frame edits, jump cuts and an overall sense of structure. 

PHG-5633
Interactive Programing for Artists
Fall semester: 3 credits
This course is for students who want to add interactivity to their art. You know how to make an image in Photoshop, but what if you want it to disappear just because people are looking at it? You can edit videos with Final Cut Pro, but what if you want the video to jiggle when someone’s screaming at it? You can create 3D objects in Maya, but what if you want it to react to the sound of the people in your installation? We will examine techniques used to create interactive artworks. Technical processes will be explained and demonstrated, and students will acquire basic programming skills they can build upon to create their own interactive works. 

PHG-5811
Strategies of Critique Dialogue Fluency
Fall semester: 3 credits
This course is designed to aid students in developing the dialogue necessary to actively conduct discussion of their own works and that of their fellow students in the critical and critique environment in the lens and screen arts. Vocabulary, idiomatic expressions and grammatical structures will be developed in order to help students adapt to the idiosyncrasies of speaking fluently. The course will feature exercises in verbal descriptions, media presentations, presentations by artists and photographers, and analysis of student artwork. 

PHG-6030
Master Critique
Fall semester: 6 credits
Group critique seminars are the focal point of student activity in any given semester. Assisted by their peers, and guided by prominent figures in the visual arts, students will concentrate on producing a coherent body of work that best reflects their individual talents and challenges the current boundaries of their media. 

PHG-6040
Contemporary Issues: Photography and Film—A Practical Relationship
Spring semester: 3 credits
The integral and increasingly fluid relationship between the photograph and the moving image in contemporary arts practice will be explored in this course. Special attention will be paid to the critical and historical discourses that have shaped cinematic and photographic practice and tradition. One stream of discussion will focus around the differences and similarities between pertinent construction and production issues in duration and non-duration based media, e.g., image composition, the significance of editing and the treatment of time. The relevancy of these issues to each student’s work and artistic practice will also be addressed. 

PHG-6050 / PHG-6070
Thesis Forms I and II
Two semesters: 3 credits per semester
These courses are required as a preparation for the second-year thesis. Students will finalize the central ideas for their thesis projects, and consider appropriate strategies for the form, presentation and distribution of these ideas. In a highly practical way, the courses consider the history and features of various visual solutions available to photographic artists, depending on their audiences and goals. Books, exhibitions, installations and interactive presentations—the courses help students identify the questions each form raises, and work through them to find appropriate answers for their own projects. The second semester will provide instruction and critique, enabling students to complete their written thesis proposal and accompanying work. 

PHG-6200
Thesis Project
Spring semester: 6 credits
The thesis project represents a unique and original vision that furthers an understanding of creative visual expression. It is the culmination of the student’s matriculation, suitable for public viewing, accompanied by written documentation that explains the historical precedents, evolution and generation of the project. Each student works in an integrated set of relationships with the Thesis Forms instructor, fourth-semester critique class and an outside advisor chosen from the community at large. 

PHG-6210
Thesis Project: Presentation
Spring semester: 3 credits
The culmination of the thesis year and the final stage of a student’s matriculation is the formal presentation of the thesis project to a panel of faculty members. In addition to successfully passing the oral presentation, each student must submit all required written and visual documentation for the thesis project. The department chair will review all evaluations from the panel, the thesis advisor and thesis faculty. The successful completion of all components of the thesis is required for degree conferral. 

PHG-6211
Thesis Extension
One semester: 3 credits
This course is designed for students whose thesis projects have not met the unanimous approval of the Thesis Committee, or who need an additional semester to complete their projects. Students will have full access to all facilities, participate in an appropriate critique class and continue to work with their thesis advisor. 

PHG-6428
Studio: Moving Image—Postproduction Strategies
Fall semester: 3 credits
A fundamental issue of time-based works is structure: the temporal shape and flow of a work are major determinants of its impact and meaning. What principles determine a work’s shape-in-time, its temporal architecture? What binds image and sound components into a comprehensible unit? This course will examine, in detail, specific topics that emerge during the postproduction phase of a moving-image project. It will focus on the organization of materials and workflow strategies, as well as sound, color, special effects and installation issues. Students will use their current projects as material in a series of exercises and assignments addressing macro- and micro-movie structures, including sound-picture relationships, multichannel and installation architectures, and image manipulations and compositing. Student presentations will be balanced by examples drawn from movies, documentary, television, online sources and artists’ cinema works for the white cube, the black box and public space.

 

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