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From Imprint:

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Navigating a career as a so-called creative professional can be a tricky and occasionally demoralizing project. Designers, writers, artists, and their ilk want to do original, meaningful work—but they also need to make a living, and that can necessitate some painful compromises (taking on less-than-ideal commissions to build a portfolio; slinging espresso shots to pay the Wi-Fi bill). If this sounds like a familiar predicament, consider signing up for James Victore’s Take This Job & Love It, a one-day symposium in New York City on September 29. (Registration closes two weeks from today.) During the event, Victore—the outspoken Brooklyn-based designer, author, and YouTube pep-talker extraordinaire—will reveal his “11 Commandments” of creativity (see the image below for a preview) and teach attendees how to find meaning in their work and “reach a higher level of badass-dom.” Here, Victore answers our questions about the symposium, striking a work-life balance, and avoiding crappy day jobs.

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What was the impetus for Take This Job & Love It?

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This symposium is something that has been building for the last few years. I had been teaching and lecturing around the world for a while. Then my book (Victore or, Who Died and Made You Boss?) came out and changed everything. I found on my book tour that I was no longer talking about or even showing my design work, but I was working with ideas like perfection and bravery and risk. The response has been awesome. I have a new role that I love—part teacher, part ass-kicker. Now I want to reach a bigger audience. Voila, symposium! And because I am certifiably crazy.

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One of your goals for the symposium is to help creative professionals \"reignite their passion in their business.\" Is this because a lot of creative people you meet are suffering from burnout?

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This is a tough business, it's always tough to equate your passions with pay. I don't want to attract folks whose greatest reward in life is a paycheck; I want people who believe that a paycheck isn't enough. I want people who want to be received for and paid for what they bring to the party, who want success on their own terms and who understand that failure is necessary for success. I believe that this \"risk\" is no risk at all—it's opening yourself up to new opportunities and killing \"the usual way of doing things\"... (continue reading)

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