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From Photo District News:"Though currently based in New York City, Ima Mfon was born and raised in Lagos, Nigeria, where his work will be exhibited at the 2015 LagosPhoto Festival this fall. Mfon pursued photography while working full-time as a technology consultant, and recently received his Masters in Photography. ‘It has been one of the best decisions of my life,’ he says. Though new to the field professionally, Mfon has a number of projects in his portfolio, and is working on building his Instagram following. We asked Mfon to explain his interest in photography, and what he’s currently pursuing as a photographer.

Photo District News: How long have you been making pictures?

Ima Mfon: I played with a few toy cameras and digital cameras growing up, but I first started shooting seriously about 8 years ago while I was completing my undergraduate studies at the University of Texas at Austin.

I’ve been a professional photographer for 11 months now. I used to be a full-time IT consultant, and I quit my job last year to pursue my Masters at the School of Visual Arts and start my photography career simultaneously. People thought I was crazy, but my family and friends have been extremely supportive and it’s been a great year so far!

PDN: What attracted you to photography?

IM: I’m a very nostalgic person. And I think I developed a habit of documenting my life and my surroundings. My first memory of consciously documenting my life was when I was on a vacation with my mother and brother in 2004. My mother bought me a 4-megapixel digital camera. We visited Kew Gardens in London. I took a lot of pictures, and printed them on our home desktop printer. I never did anything with those pictures; I just kept them in my room. So I think I was inspired by an innate desire to preserve the moments which I considered important. My father was also a photographer when he was younger. He photographed all of us, and looking at his pictures also triggered a sense of nostalgia in me.

Spending most of my childhood in Nigeria and my adulthood in America, I’ve assimilated two very different sets of social and cultural values. I try to reconcile them and figure out who I really am, which causes a lot of introspection. I end up expressing this through my work..." (For the full interview and more photos, click here)

Photo: Ima Mfon, Untitled 06 from "Nigerian Identity."

"Untitled 06" from "Nigerian Identity." © Ima Mfon

Though currently based in New York City, Ima Mfon was born and raised in Lagos, Nigeria, where his work will be exhibited at the 2015 LagosPhoto Festival this fall. Mfon pursued photography while working full-time as a technology consultant, and recently received his Masters in Photography. “It has been one of the best decisions of my life,” he says. Though new to the field professionally, Mfon has a number of projects in his portfolio, and is working on building his Instagram following. We asked Mfon to explain his interest in photography, and what he’s currently pursuing as a photographer.

Photo District News: How long have you been making pictures?

Ima Mfon: I played with a few toy cameras and digital cameras growing up, but I first started shooting seriously about 8 years ago while I was completing my undergraduate studies at the University of Texas at Austin.

I’ve been a professional photographer for 11 months now. I used to be a full-time IT consultant, and I quit my job last year to pursue my Masters at the School of Visual Arts and start my photography career simultaneously. People thought I was crazy, but my family and friends have been extremely supportive and it’s been a great year so far!

PDN: What attracted you to photography?

IM: I’m a very nostalgic person. And I think I developed a habit of documenting my life and my surroundings. My first memory of consciously documenting my life was when I was on a vacation with my mother and brother in 2004. My mother bought me a 4-megapixel digital camera. We visited Kew Gardens in London. I took a lot of pictures, and printed them on our home desktop printer. I never did anything with those pictures; I just kept them in my room. So I think I was inspired by an innate desire to preserve the moments which I considered important. My father was also a photographer when he was younger. He photographed all of us, and looking at his pictures also triggered a sense of nostalgia in me.

Spending most of my childhood in Nigeria and my adulthood in America, I’ve assimilated two very different sets of social and cultural values. I try to reconcile them and figure out who I really am, which causes a lot of introspection. I end up expressing this through my work.

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2015/07/32763/#gallery-1

Though currently based in New York City, Ima Mfon was born and raised in Lagos, Nigeria, where his work will be exhibited at the 2015 LagosPhoto Festival this fall. Mfon pursued photography while working full-time as a technology consultant, and recently received his Masters in Photography. “It has been one of the best decisions of my life,” he says. Though new to the field professionally, Mfon has a number of projects in his portfolio, and is working on building his Instagram following. We asked Mfon to explain his interest in photography, and what he’s currently pursuing as a photographer.

Photo District News: How long have you been making pictures?

Ima Mfon: I played with a few toy cameras and digital cameras growing up, but I first started shooting seriously about 8 years ago while I was completing my undergraduate studies at the University of Texas at Austin.

I’ve been a professional photographer for 11 months now. I used to be a full-time IT consultant, and I quit my job last year to pursue my Masters at the School of Visual Arts and start my photography career simultaneously. People thought I was crazy, but my family and friends have been extremely supportive and it’s been a great year so far!

PDN: What attracted you to photography?

IM: I’m a very nostalgic person. And I think I developed a habit of documenting my life and my surroundings. My first memory of consciously documenting my life was when I was on a vacation with my mother and brother in 2004. My mother bought me a 4-megapixel digital camera. We visited Kew Gardens in London. I took a lot of pictures, and printed them on our home desktop printer. I never did anything with those pictures; I just kept them in my room. So I think I was inspired by an innate desire to preserve the moments which I considered important. My father was also a photographer when he was younger. He photographed all of us, and looking at his pictures also triggered a sense of nostalgia in me.

Spending most of my childhood in Nigeria and my adulthood in America, I’ve assimilated two very different sets of social and cultural values. I try to reconcile them and figure out who I really am, which causes a lot of introspection. I end up expressing this through my work.

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2015/07/32763/#gallery-1

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