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Writing and Literature I

Course Details
  • Course Number HCD-1020-B
  • Times Tuesday, Thursday, 9:00AM - 12:50PM
  • Dates May 19 - Jun 23
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

With its focus on developing an argument, this course offers an introduction to some of the skills necessary for critical analysis of written art. It will include a review of writing basics (grammar, coherence, idea development, sentence and essay structure). Since reading widely is a foundation of good writing, course readings are drawn from a selection of premodern Western works, including drama, poetry, the narrative and the critical essay, which will be used as discussion and writing prompts.

Instructor

Ginny MacKenzie

Poet, fiction and nonfiction writer

Education

MFA, Goddard College

Books

Poetry, By Morning; Skipstone; editor, translator, New York/Beijing; novel, Sleeping with Gypsies

Publications include

The Nation, Artful Dodge, Agni Review, Crab Orchard Review, Pequod, Seneca Review, Ploughshares, American Literary Review, Threepenny Review, Boulevard, New Letters, Prairie Schooner, Hobart, Iowa Review, Mississippi Review, Southern Humanities Review, Antioch Review

Awards include

John Guyon Literary Non-fiction Award; Aaron H. Rubenfeld Award; Backwaters Press Poetry Award; Ann Arbor Book Festival; Leo Love Poetry Prize, University of New Mexico

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Writing and Literature I

Course Details
  • Course Number HCD-1020-A
  • Times Monday, Wednesday, 6:00PM - 9:50PM
  • Dates May 27 - Jul 01
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 136 West 21st Street

Description

With its focus on developing an argument, this course offers an introduction to some of the skills necessary for critical analysis of written art. It will include a review of writing basics (grammar, coherence, idea development, sentence and essay structure). Since reading widely is a foundation of good writing, course readings are drawn from a selection of premodern Western works, including drama, poetry, the narrative and the critical essay, which will be used as discussion and writing prompts. NOTE: Class schedule, Mon., Wed.; May 27-July 1 (begins Wednesday, May 27).

Instructor

Maryhelen Hendricks

Co-chair, Humanities and Sciences Department, School of Visual Arts; director, National Conference on Liberal Arts and the Education of Artists

Education:

BA, University of Massachusetts; MA, PhD, New York University

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Writing and Literature II

Course Details
  • Course Number HCD-1025-B
  • Times Tuesday, Thursday, 9:00AM - 12:50PM
  • Dates May 19 - Jun 23
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

By emphasizing writing, reading and critical thinking, this course will aid students in writing essays that develop an argument. Students will write essays and a research paper. Grammar, coherence and essay development will be a part of instruction. Since reading widely is one of the foundations of good writing, the course readings are drawn from a selection of modern works, including drama, poetry, the narrative and the critical essay, which will be used as discussion and writing prompts.

Instructor

Frances Eleanor Litvack

Writer

Education

BA, Temple University; MA, CUNY; PhD, New York University

Book

Le Droit du Seigneur in European and American Literature

Awards include

Anais Nin Memorial Fellowshi; Penfield Fellowship; Goethe House Scholarship; Gary Carey Award, Humanities and Sciences Department, School of Visual Arts

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Writing and Literature II

Course Details
  • Course Number HCD-1025-A
  • Times Monday, Wednesday, 6:00PM - 9:50PM
  • Dates May 27 - Jul 01
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 133/141 West 21st Street

Description

By emphasizing writing, reading and critical thinking, this course will aid students in writing essays that develop an argument. Students will write essays and a research paper. Grammar, coherence and essay development will be a part of instruction. Since reading widely is one of the foundations of good writing, the course readings are drawn from a selection of modern works, including drama, poetry, the narrative and the critical essay, which will be used as discussion and writing prompts. NOTE: Class schedule, Mon., Wed.; May 27-July 1 (begins Wednesday, May 27)

Instructor

John Robinson-Appels

Writer; choreographer; artistic director, Company Appels

Education

MA, PhD, CUNY Graduate Center

Performances include:

Whitney Museum of American Art; Seattle Art Museum; Museum of Avignon, France; Dansens Hus, Stockholm; Museum Abteiberg, Germany; Biennale Nationale du Val de Marne, France; Museum of Contemporary Art, Montreal; The Pace Gallery; Museum of Fine Arts Gent, Belgium

Publications include

Flash Art, Artforum, Artweek, Contemporary Masterworks, Tableau, Yale Journal of Criticism, Green Zero, American Letters and Commentary, Caryatid, Epoch, Odessa Poetry Review, Contemporary Artists

Awards include

Fulbright Fellowships, New York Foundation for the Arts, Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts Fellowship

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U.S. History II: 1865-Present

Course Details
  • Course Number HHD-2778-R
  • Times Monday, Wednesday, 9:00AM - 12:50PM
  • Dates May 27 - Jul 01
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Closed
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

An examination of the forces behind the social, political and economic developments of American civilization and their interrelationships will be the focus of this course. Special attention will be placed on the role of individuals such as Theodore Roosevelt; Harry S. Truman; John F. Kennedy; Richard Nixon; Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Bill Clinton; and the variety of interpretations of American history. Readings will be from primary sources of the men and women who made this history. The text will be Daniel Boorstin's The Americans. NOTE: There is no prerequisite for this course. Class schedule: Mon.-Wed., May 27-July 1 (begins Wednesday, May 27).

Instructor

William Rednour

Historian

Education:

BA, summa cum laude, Pace University; M.Phil., PhD, CUNY Graduate Center

Publications include:

Renaissance Quarterly

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History of Religion

Course Details
  • Course Number HHD-3611-R
  • Times Monday, Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:50PM
  • Dates May 18 - Jul 08
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

This course surveys the major religions of the world beginning with Hinduism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism and ending with Christianity and Islam. The spiritual crisis of the 6th century BCE that gave rise to Buddhism, Confucianism and Taoism in the East will be compared to the epochs that gave rise to Christianity and Islam. While examining the similarities as well as the differences in the ultimate concepts of major Eastern and Western religions, such as moksha, nirvana, Tao and the kingdom of heaven, this course will explore the historical conditions in which the world religions evolved.

Instructor

George Ouwendijk

Historian

Education:

BA, California State University

Presentations include:

"The Reform of the Human Mind: The Significance of Rhetoric in Galileian Science," "Christoph Scheiner's Cosmology: Fluid Heavens and the Question of Authority," "Apelles Hidden, Apollo Revealed: Pseudonymous Identity in the Work of Christoph Scheiner," Sixteenth Century Studies Conference; "Astrology and Jesuit Devotion: Vestiges of the Renaissance in the Work of Jeremias Drexelius, S.J.," Renaissance Society of America

Publications include:

Sixteenth Century Journal, Renaissance Quarterly, The History Teacher

Honors include:

Phi Kappa Phi

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The Genesis of Radical Islam

Course Details
  • Course Number HHD-4121-R
  • Times Monday, Wednesday, 3:00PM - 5:50PM
  • Dates May 18 - Jul 08
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

What cultural, political and social conditions have given rise to the emergence of Islamic radicalism and terrorism? What is the constituency of radical Islam and how different is it from Islamic terrorism? In the wake of the recent crisis, what future possibilities lie ahead for the political Islamic movements? What are the various movements grouped under the umbrella of Islam? This course is designed to explore these questions by studying the birth of Islam and the pattern of its expansion and development throughout history. We will also examine the recent history of interaction and confrontation between the Middle East and the Western world. While particular attention will be paid to the "Palestinian question" and the achievements and failures of non-Islamic discourses in the formation of Islamic radicalism, the genesis of Islamic terrorism will be studied in light of the new wave of globalization and the emergence of the new world order.

Instructor

George Ouwendijk

Historian

Education:

BA, California State University

Presentations include:

"The Reform of the Human Mind: The Significance of Rhetoric in Galileian Science," "Christoph Scheiner's Cosmology: Fluid Heavens and the Question of Authority," "Apelles Hidden, Apollo Revealed: Pseudonymous Identity in the Work of Christoph Scheiner," Sixteenth Century Studies Conference; "Astrology and Jesuit Devotion: Vestiges of the Renaissance in the Work of Jeremias Drexelius, S.J.," Renaissance Society of America

Publications include:

Sixteenth Century Journal, Renaissance Quarterly, The History Teacher

Honors include:

Phi Kappa Phi

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Myth and the Cosmos

Course Details
  • Course Number HLD-2154-R
  • Times Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 1:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Dates May 26 - Jun 29
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

This course will study of some of the world's ancient religious myths of creation, the cosmos, and man's role within it, as contrasted with the universe of modern science. Among the mythologies to be considered are those of the Egyptians, Hebrews, Indians, Chinese and Greeks. Texts for the course are: Homer's Odyssey (E.V. Rieu translation, Penguin paperback); Plato's Symposium (B. Jowett translation, many editions); John Updike's The Centaur; The Epic of Gilgamesh. NOTE: Class schedule, Mon.-Wed., May 26-June 29 (begins Tuesday, May 26)

Instructor

Louis Phillips

Playwright; poet; short story writer; editor, Words

Education:

BA, Stetson University; MA, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; MA, Hunter College

Published works include:

The Bus to the Moon, A Dream of Countries Where No One Dare Live, The Hot Corner, The Man Who Stole the Atlantic Ocean, Bulkington, The Envoi Messages, The Audience Book of Theater Quotations

Plays produced include:

The Ballroom in St. Patrick's Cathedral, The Last of the Marx Brothers' Writers, The Great American Quiz Show Scandal

Awards include:

Distinguished Scholar-Teacher Award, School of Visual Arts; Swallow's Tale Poetry Prize; Gary Carey Award, Humanities and Sciences Department, School of Visual Arts; National Endowment for the Arts; Critics' Short Story Prize; Regents Fellow, University of California, San Diego

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Short Fiction II

Course Details
  • Course Number HLD-2224-A
  • Times Tuesday, Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:50PM
  • Dates May 19 - Jul 07
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

Some of the finest literary work of the last 100 years has been in the form of short fiction. In this course, we will study the short stories and novellas of such writers as Raymond Carver, J.D. Salinger, Jorge Luis Borges, John Updike, Joyce Carol Oates and Tillie Olsen. NOTE: There is no prerequisite for this course.

Instructor

Robert Auletta

Playwright

Education:

BA, Queens College; MFA, Yale University

Productions for:

American Repertory Theater, Yale Repertory Theater, Alley Theater, La Jolla Playhouse, Market Theater, Cafe La MaMa, PS 122, SCENA Theater


Plays include:

A Young Woman in a Trash Basket, Amazons, Stops/Virgins, The Persians


Awards include:

National Endowment for the Arts, Hollywood Drama-Logue Award, New York State Foundation Grant, Obie. Residencies include: Millay Colony for the Arts, MacDowell Colony, Ledig House

 

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Literature and Sexual Diversity

Course Details
  • Course Number HLD-3224-R
  • Times Monday, Wednesday, 1:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Dates May 27 - Jul 01
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 133/141 West 21st Street

Description

For students interested in the representation of human sexuality, this course will focus on how same-gendered love contributes to the creation of works of literature. The works of visual and performing artists will also be discussed, and we will discuss why same-gendered representation has been somewhat veiled in the visual arts as compared with the literary world. Seminal 19th- and 20th-century American and European literary works will be analyzed in terms of the formation of a modernist gay literary style. While the course is primarily concerned with gay and lesbian literature, additional readings include literary portrayals of bisexuality, transsexuality, transvestism, and other "gender-bending" androgynous identities. Examination of the homosexual literature of Ancient Greece, including Plato'sSymposium, Aristophanes'sKnights,Sappho's poetry and The Greek Anthology will provide an historical context for discussion of modern literary works such as Wilde's The Portrait of Dorian Gray, Whitman'sLeaves of Grass and Ginsberg'sHowl. We will also look at selected poems of Shakespeare, Cavafy,Rimbaud and Verlaine, as well as plays such as Tennessee Williams's Cat On a Hot Tin Roofand Kushner'sAngels in America. NOTE: Class schedule, Mon., Wed.; May 27-July 1 (begins Wednesday, May 27).

Instructor

John Robinson-Appels

Writer; choreographer; artistic director, Company Appels

Education

MA, PhD, CUNY Graduate Center

Performances include:

Whitney Museum of American Art; Seattle Art Museum; Museum of Avignon, France; Dansens Hus, Stockholm; Museum Abteiberg, Germany; Biennale Nationale du Val de Marne, France; Museum of Contemporary Art, Montreal; The Pace Gallery; Museum of Fine Arts Gent, Belgium

Publications include

Flash Art, Artforum, Artweek, Contemporary Masterworks, Tableau, Yale Journal of Criticism, Green Zero, American Letters and Commentary, Caryatid, Epoch, Odessa Poetry Review, Contemporary Artists

Awards include

Fulbright Fellowships, New York Foundation for the Arts, Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts Fellowship

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Radical and Revolutionary American Literature

Course Details
  • Course Number HLD-3514-R
  • Times Monday, Wednesday, 12:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Dates Jun 01 - Jul 20
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

This course will provide an overview of radical and revolutionary American literature from the American Revolution to present. We will read and discuss the works of such authors and artists as Thomas Paine, Allen Ginsberg, Abraham Lincoln, Malcolm X, Walt Whitman, Tillie Olsen, Jack London, Woody Guthrie and Bruce Springsteen. A major focus of the course will be on working-class fiction and reality in light of the economic depression and cultural diversity of the 20th century.

Instructor

Joel W. Barkan

District director, International Trade Administration, United States Department of Commerce

Education:

BS, Seton Hall University; New School for Social Research

Professional experience includes:

Executive director, New York State Temporary Commission on Child Welfare; regional director, U.S. Office for Civil Rights, Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Region II

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Symbolist Literatrue

Course Details
  • Course Number HLD-4267-R
  • Times Tuesday, Thursday, 3:00PM - 5:50PM
  • Dates May 26 - Jul 14
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 136 West 21st Street

Description

Who were the symbolists? This course explores the work of late 19th-century poets, novelists, mystics and seers. The symbolists movement, which included the visual arts, established an avantgarde that broke with norms of representation and veered toward dreams, hallucinatory states of consciousness, heightened sensory experience and epiphany. We will read the poems of Rimbaud, Verlaine and Baudelaire as well as novels by Huysmans and Wilde. Expect to encounter woolly discourse, for the symbolists foreshadowed the advent of String Theory, abstract art and many other peculiar twists in modern ideas about "the real."

Instructor

Daniel R. Riccuito

Artist, writer

Education:

BFA, Parsons School of Design; MFA, Queens College

Group exhibitions include:

Bowery Gallery, Richard Humphrey Gallery

Publications include:

Modern Painters, Art & Antiques

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Contemporary Cultural Criticism: Where Do We Go From Here?

Course Details
  • Course Number HPD-3472-R
  • Times Tuesday, Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:50PM
  • Dates May 26 - Jul 14
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 136 West 21st Street

Description

This course explores the collision between cultures based on the worship of nature and those fixated on continuous development. We will address such questions as: What basic human needs are fulfilled by the structure of modern urban civilization? What are the philosophical assumptions that relentlessly drive technological "progress?" What are the consequences of the destruction of communal societies and the forced re-education of indigenous, earth-based peoples? What is the potential for a renewal of commitment to natural and humanistic values? Readings include selections from such authors as Henry David Thoreau, Erich Fromm, Margaret Mead, R.D. Laing, Jerry Mander and Jean Liedloff.

Instructor

Daniel R. Riccuito

Artist, writer

Education:

BFA, Parsons School of Design; MFA, Queens College

Group exhibitions include:

Bowery Gallery, Richard Humphrey Gallery

Publications include:

Modern Painters, Art & Antiques

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Abnormal Psychology I: Neurotic and Character Disorders

Course Details
  • Course Number HPD-3641-R
  • TimesTuesday, 6:00PM - 9:50PM
  • Dates May 26 - Aug 11
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Closed
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

This course will introduce students to the psychological and interpersonal conflicts that underlie obsessional, hysterical, depressive and narcissistic disorders. Treatment strategies will also be explored with reference to actual case histories. Readings will include selections from such clinical theorists as Sigmund Freud, Anna Freud, David Shapiro, Alice Miller, Charles Brenner, Karen Horney and Heinz Kohut.

Instructor

David A. Borg

School psychologist, New York City Department of Education; psychologist, private practice; alternate Brooklyn chapter delegate, executive board, New York Association of School Psychologists

Education:

BA, cum laude, Baruch College; MS, with honors, CUNY; MA, Long Island University; advanced certificate in school psychology, with honors, CUNY; PhD, Long Island University

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Modern Art and Psychology: The Secrets of the Soul

Course Details
  • Course Number HPD-4057-R
  • TimesMonday, 6:00PM - 9:50PM
  • Dates Jun 01 - Aug 03
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 133/141 West 21st Street

Description

What do dreams mean? What causes madness? How should society care for the insane? With the rise of science in modern times, psychologists have become the new doctors of the soul who address these age-old questions. This course will present their fascinating answers, as well as examine the influence of psychology on culture and the visual arts. Topics include: 19thcentury asylum medicine, 20th-century psychoanalysis, neuroscience, and metaphors for the psyche in the arts. Readings include excerpts from Madness in America: Cultural and Medical Perspectives on Mental Illness before 1914 and Dreams 1900-2000: Science, Art and the Unconscious Mind. NOTE: In addition to the 10 in-class sessions, a field trip will be scheduled at the beginning of the semester.

Instructor

Lynn Gamwell

Writer

Education:

BA, University of Illinois, Chicago; MFA, Claremont McKenna College; MA, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

Curatorial work includes:

"Sigmund Freud Antiquities: Fragments from a Buried Past," Freud Museum, London; "Madness in America: Cultural and Medical Perceptions of Mental Illness Before 1914," University of Pennsylvania; "Art After Einstein," New York Academy of Sciences; "Sacred Geometry and Secular Science," Loyola University Museum of Art

Books include:

Exploring the Invisible: Art, Science, and the Spiritual; Searching for Certainty: Art, Mathematics, and the Mystical; editor, Dreams 1900-2000: Art, Science, and the Unconscious Mind

Awards include:

Gradiva Prize, National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis; Book of the Year, London Times

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The 21st-Century Family: Alternative Lifestyles, Civil Unions, Gay Marriage

Course Details
  • Course Number HPD-4282-A
  • Times Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, 6:00PM - 9:50PM
  • Dates May 26 - Jun 22
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

This behavioral science course will examine the basic functions of the family unit as well as its cross-cultural and historical forms. We will focus on the profound changes occurring within the 21st-century family unit and the reasons for these changes. Emphasis will be placed on the new American family: civil unions, gay marriage, domestic partnerships, single-parent families, step-families and blended families as well as other familial units. Issues will include a discussion of the political and economic impact of the new family paradigm upon society, alternative lifestyles, family values agenda, the divorce culture and abortion. This course gives students an understanding of the history of the family unit and how these institutions have changed over the past 25 years. Students will also explore how media and cultural institutions shaped the notion of marriage and family during the last 60 years. NOTE: Class schedule, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday; May 26 - June 22 (begins Tuesday, May 26)

Instructor

Susan I. Horowitz

Urban planner, New York City Community Planning; social worker

Education:

BA, York College; MS, Columbia University

 

Professional experience includes:

Formerly, assistant for community affairs, Office of the Mayor, City of New York; mediator, hearing officer, Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

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Science in the Modern World

Course Details
  • Course Number HSD-3016-R
  • Times Monday, Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:50PM
  • Dates Jun 01 - Jul 20
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

The triumphs of modern science have been heralded as an emancipation from the burdens of ignorance, fear, toil and disease. But have the sciences fulfilled their promise to liberate humankind? Have we truly overcome superstition and dogma, or simply replaced them with the uncertainties of a scientific "metaphysics" bristling with mysterious forces, powers, fields, waves, quarks and rays? Have we achieved the goals of knowledge and power, or have we reinvented ignorance and multiplied the dangers that surround us? In an attempt to come to grips with these questions, this course takes stock of recent scientific progress in fields such as anthropology, cosmology, ecology, subatomic physics and genetic engineering, measuring the claims of science and technology against those of the individual.

Instructor

Thomas E. Gorrell

Research associate, Haskins Laboratories, Pace University

Education:

BS, Purdue University; PhD, Michigan State University

Publications include:

Biochemistry Biophysics Research Communication; National Academy of Science Proceedings; Sexually Transmitted Diseases; Molecular Biochemistry Parasitology and Carlsberg Research Common

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Geology

Course Details
  • Course Number HSD-3112-R
  • TimesWednesday, 6:00PM - 9:50PM
  • Dates May 20 - Jul 15
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

This is an introduction to the composition and history of the planet earth. We will begin with a basic discussion of mineralogy and the earth's composition, followed by a survey of the earth's history as inferred from the sedimentary record and other evidence, including the formation and development of the atmosphere and soils as well as continental plate tectonics. The role of the biosphere in formation and maintaining the physicochemical structure of Earth's surface will be examined. Visits to the American Museum of Natural History and sites of geological interest are included. NOTE: In addition to the nine in-class sessions, two field trips will be scheduled at the beginning of the semester.

Instructor

Michael Levandowsky

Environmental scientist

Education:

BA, Antioch College; MS, New York University; MA, PhD, Columbia University

Publications include:

Nature, Science, Biological Bulletin, American Naturalist, Quarterly Review of Biology; editor, Biochemistry and Physiology of Protozoa

Awards include:

Whitehall Foundation, Templeton Foundation, National Science Foundation Science Faculty Fellowship, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New York Sea Grant Institute, Hudson River Foundation, American Society for Microbiology

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Botany: The World of Plants

Course Details
  • Course Number HSD-3113-R
  • TimesThursday, 6:00PM - 9:50PM
  • Dates May 21 - Jul 16
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Closed
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

In this course, we will explore the evolution, physiology and ecology of plants. There will be field trips to study wild plant communities in the area, as well as to a botanical garden. Students will be expected to go on at least two of these trips, which will be on Sunday afternoons. Students will make herbaria of plants collected during the course. The basic role of plants in the biosphere, and the uses of plants by humans will be discussed. Lectures will be supplemented by Attenborough's video, The Private Life of Plants, and by readings from the essays of Roger Swain and others. NOTE: In addition to the nine in-class sessions, two field trips will be scheduled at the beginning of the semester.

Instructor

Michael Levandowsky

Environmental scientist

Education:

BA, Antioch College; MS, New York University; MA, PhD, Columbia University

Publications include:

Nature, Science, Biological Bulletin, American Naturalist, Quarterly Review of Biology; editor, Biochemistry and Physiology of Protozoa

Awards include:

Whitehall Foundation, Templeton Foundation, National Science Foundation Science Faculty Fellowship, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New York Sea Grant Institute, Hudson River Foundation, American Society for Microbiology

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Art, Science and the Spiritual

Course Details
  • Course Number HSD-4026-R
  • TimesMonday, 1:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Dates Jun 01 - Aug 03
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Closed
  • Location 133/141 West 21st Street

Description

In this course, students will learn how directly, profoundly and indisputably modern science has transformed modern art, and how artists have created new forms of spiritual art for secular society. Age-old questions-What is the origin of life? What is the universe made of?-were asked anew in the modern era. Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein gave answers that precipitated abstract art by forever changing how we understand reality. The rise of science also entailed the decline of organized religion, and traditional theological questions were reformulated in secular terms. What is our place in the universe? How does a person know the world? The answers proposed by psychologists-the new doctors of the soul-have revolutionized modern society's understanding of the human psyche. Artists responded by creating metaphors for the human condition during the first secular, scientific age in human history. NOTE: In addition to the 10 in-class sessions, a field trip will be scheduled at the beginning of the semester.

Instructor

Lynn Gamwell

Writer

Education:

BA, University of Illinois, Chicago; MFA, Claremont McKenna College; MA, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

Curatorial work includes:

"Sigmund Freud Antiquities: Fragments from a Buried Past," Freud Museum, London; "Madness in America: Cultural and Medical Perceptions of Mental Illness Before 1914," University of Pennsylvania; "Art After Einstein," New York Academy of Sciences; "Sacred Geometry and Secular Science," Loyola University Museum of Art

Books include:

Exploring the Invisible: Art, Science, and the Spiritual; Searching for Certainty: Art, Mathematics, and the Mystical; editor, Dreams 1900-2000: Art, Science, and the Unconscious Mind

Awards include:

Gradiva Prize, National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis; Book of the Year, London Times

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The Creative Self: Autobiography

Course Details
  • Course Number HWD-2534-A
  • Times Tuesday, Thursday, 1:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Dates May 19 - Jun 23
  • Credits 3.00
  • Cost$2550
  • Additional Fees$0
  • Status Open
  • Location 380 2nd Ave

Description

In this writing workshop, each student will craft his or her autobiography while reflecting on personal and creative life experiences. We will take a close look at the construction of the self, drawing comparisons among literary forms and exploring the tensions inherent in self-narration: self-invention vs. self-disclosure, design vs. truth and memory vs. imagination. This course is a voyage of self-discovery. Students will write a narrative manuscript and keep personal journals. A guest author will conduct an in-class workshop. We will read works of narrative self-disclosure by such contemporary authors as Richard Wright, Sylvia Plath, Mary Karr, Malika Oufkir, Bei Dao and Vladimir Nabokov.

Instructor

Ginny MacKenzie

Poet, fiction and nonfiction writer

Education

MFA, Goddard College

Books

Poetry, By Morning; Skipstone; editor, translator, New York/Beijing; novel, Sleeping with Gypsies

Publications include

The Nation, Artful Dodge, Agni Review, Crab Orchard Review, Pequod, Seneca Review, Ploughshares, American Literary Review, Threepenny Review, Boulevard, New Letters, Prairie Schooner, Hobart, Iowa Review, Mississippi Review, Southern Humanities Review, Antioch Review

Awards include

John Guyon Literary Non-fiction Award; Aaron H. Rubenfeld Award; Backwaters Press Poetry Award; Ann Arbor Book Festival; Leo Love Poetry Prize, University of New Mexico

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School of Visual Arts | 209 East 23 Street, NY, NY 10010-3994 | Tel: 212.592.2000 | Fax: 212.725.3587